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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Hood's Retreat

 
 
Hood's Retreat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
1. Hood's Retreat Marker
Inscription. Following the Battle of Franklin, the Union army dashed north into their supply base of Nashville and its vast network of fortifications where Gen. George H. Thomas had assembled a sizeable force. In pursuit came Gen. John Bell Hood’s battered Confederate Army of Tennessee, stopping just south of the city.

Then, Gen. Thomas waited. Despite mounting pressure from President Lincoln and Gen. U.S. grant to attack, Thomas let the frigid winter of 1864 weaken his opponent even further. For days, dropping temperatures and icy rains battered Hood’s exposed troops. On December 15th, Thomas finally launched an overwhelming attack, crushing Hood’s once formidable army in two days. On the night of December 16th, Hood’s remaining men retreated southward toward Franklin.

Over the next week and a half, Federal infantry and cavalry pushed Hood’s dissolving command further and further south. Despite several intense rearguard fights, the dwindling Army of Tennessee escaped across the Tennessee River, eventually halting in northeast Mississippi. In January 1865, Hood resigned.

In his place stepped Gen. Joseph Johnston, who took the remnants of the Army of the Tennessee into the Carolinas to oppose Gen. William T. Sherman’s army fresh from its “March to the Sea.”

On April 26, 1865, more than two weeks
Hood's Retreat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
2. Hood's Retreat Marker
after Appomattox, Gen. Johnston and his men surrendered to Gen. Sherman’s army at Bentonville, North Carolina. The war was over, and the survivors from both sides could finally head home.
 
Erected by Franklin's Charge.
 
Location. 35° 54.297′ N, 86° 51.519′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Final Campaign 1864 (here, next to this marker); The Battle of Franklin (here, next to this marker); Standing at the Crossroads 1861 (here, next to this marker); Becoming the Front Line 1862 (here, next to this marker); A Crucial War Zone 1863 (here, next to this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .
Hood's Retreat image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
3. Hood's Retreat

1. Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. (Submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
2. The Battle of Franklin. (Submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Before the Battle of Nashville image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
4. Before the Battle of Nashville
Union troops wait outside of Nashville, ready to move against John Bell Hood's weary and weathered army. Well supplied with ample shelter, weapons, and ammunition, the Federal Forces also had the cold winter on their side, as many of the opposing Confederates lacked food, coats, tents, and shoes. Hood's army also had lost four times as many men than the Federals at the preceding Battle of Franklin, reducing them to the brink of destruction.
December 16, 1864 - After the Battle of Nashville image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
5. December 16, 1864 - After the Battle of Nashville
Massive engagements, like the two-day Battle of Nashville, not only killed and maimed thousands of men and draft animals, they also destroyed whole landscapes.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 156 times since then. Last updated on May 17, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 11, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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