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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Advancing With Scott's Brigade

Following in Their Footsteps

 
 
Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
1. Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker
Inscription. (preface)
This walkway traces the route that the men of Confederate Gen. Thomas M. Scott’s brigade took in the Battle of Franklin. Read below to see what it was like then and to follow in their footsteps
Distance to Union Lines: 1,500 yards (1,370 m)
Local Time: 4:35 pm, November 30, 1864

During the previous nine days, Confederate Gen. Thomas M. Scott’s brigade marched more than 120 miles (193 km) through winter weather and fought several skirmishes to reach this field. Consisting of five regiments from Alabama plus another from Louisiana, the brigade included many men without shoes, coats, and blankets. Food was scarce. The day was very warm for late November, near 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees Celsius), and the good weather lifted their spirits.

Marching in columns from the south, Scott’s men began to fan out into battle lines to attack the Union defenses. To your left, the rest of the Army of Tennessee stretched westward in similar parallel lines. The assaulting force was so large that much of it was out of sight from here, hidden by the softly rolling hills and the army’s vast breadth of more than two miles (3.2km).

At this point the brigade was within range of Union rifled artillery. Percussion shells and bursting fuse shells exploded here, splintering trees and shattering
Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
2. Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker
men. Shooting back with rifled muskets was futile, as Scott’s men had to march at least ten more minutes before the Union defenses came within small-arms range. The Federals were so well protected by high ground and earthworks that the Confederates needed to move even closer to fire with any effect.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 54.512′ N, 86° 51.457′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1368 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Advancing With Scott's Brigade (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank
Gen. Thomas M. Scott image. Click for full size.
Battle of Franklin Trust Archives
3. Gen. Thomas M. Scott
Confederate Gen. Thomas M. Scott was a thirty-five-year-old Georgian who had served since the start of the war. He survived the Battle of Franklin, barely. Many of his men did not.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Advancing With Scott's Brigade (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .  Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. (Submitted on May 24, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Battle of Franklin Map image. Click for full size.
By Civil War Trust
4. Battle of Franklin Map
Trees Shattered by Artillery Shells, Virginia image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Trees Shattered by Artillery Shells, Virginia
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 25, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 24, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 68 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 24, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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