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Leesburg in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Confederate Earthworks

Guarding the Potomac River Frontier

 
 
Confederate Earthworks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
1. Confederate Earthworks Marker
Inscription. Across the ground in front of you are the remains of Confederate infantry earthworks most likely built after the Battle of Ballís Bluff on October 21, 1861. At this time, Leesburg was on the front lines of the American Civil War and an outpost on the Potomac River frontier. The river was, for the Confederates, an international boundary between two nations at war. Leesburg was an important point to defend on that line.

After Ballís Bluff, the Confederates under Gen. D.H. Hill continued work on several preexisting forts to discourage another Federal attack from Maryland. They included Fort Evans (which stands today on private property to your right just beyond the shopping complex), Fort Johnson on Catoctin Ridge immediately west of Leesburg, and Fort Beauregard on a ridge overlooking Tuscarora southeast of town. Additional outer works, such as the one here, augmented the forts and sheltered the troops guarding Leesburg.

Although records for this work are lacking, it is located on a spur extending 600 yards from Fort Evans to protect the approach to the fort from the southeast. Surveys conducted early in the 21st century located at least twelve platforms where soldiersí huts may have stood.

Early in March 1862, the Confederates withdrew from Leesburg, and Union Col. John Gearyís 28th Pennsylvania Infantry
Confederate Earthworks Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
2. Confederate Earthworks Marker
occupied the town and the fortifications. The earthworks around Leesburg soon fell into disuse and deterioration. Much of Fort Evans, however, as well as traces of Fort Johnson and other works along Edwards Ferry Road such as this one, have survived.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 6.365′ N, 77° 31.625′ W. Marker is in Leesburg, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker can be reached from Fort Evans Road NE (Virginia Route 773) 0.1 miles west of Battlefield Parkway, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. The marker is outside Pho Royal in the in the Fort Evans II shopping center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 542 Fort Evans Rd NE, Leesburg VA 20176, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ballís Bluff Masked Battery (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Ballís Bluff Masked Battery (approx. half a mile away); Two-Chambered Granary (approx. one mile away); Carriage House (approx. one mile away); Well House (approx.
African Americans constructing military stockade and ditch image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. African Americans constructing military stockade and ditch
The elaborate nature of fortifications required much labor. As occurred many times during the war, the Confederate government requisitioned slave labor and impressed free blacks to assist soldiers in building earthworks here in Loudoun County. One such freedman, James Fields, later recalled, “When the rebs put up forts at Leesburg, they took me and made me work on the breastworks. Ö I stayed there 31 days – they paid me $6.00 in script for working.
one mile away); Red Rock Wilderness Overlook Regional Park (approx. one mile away); Ice House (approx. 1.1 miles away); Douglass Community School (approx. 1Ĺ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Leesburg.
 
Also see . . .  Defenses of Leesburg. (Submitted on May 25, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia.)
 
Categories. African AmericansForts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Confederate earthworks and soldiers' huts image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Confederate earthworks and soldiers' huts
Confederate Earthworks image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
5. Confederate Earthworks
Confederate Earthworks image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl
6. Confederate Earthworks
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 25, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 129 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 25, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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