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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Crab Orchard in Lincoln County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Sportsman Hill

 
 
Sportsman Hill Marker (front) image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, April 12, 2017
1. Sportsman Hill Marker (front)
Inscription.
Panel 1
Forerunner of Kentucky Derby. Site of one of the earliest circular racetracks. Crowd gathered within the half-mile track, able to see entire race. Built about 1780 by Col. Wm. Whitley, owner of estate. A fervent patriot, he built track to contrast with the British ones, using clay instead of turf and running races counter-clockwise instead of clockwise. A practice still used by oval tracks in USA. Racing here ended with the Civil War.

He built his house so that racetrack was visible from it. Meetings held in fall, bringing elite of region here. After races, which started at dawn, lavish breakfast was served.

This track greatly enhanced the prestige of KY as the fatherland of fine horses. In pre-Civil War days, it was the most popular center for horse racing and fox hunting.

Panel 2
Colonel Will Whitley, famous pioneer, Indian fighter, hero and poet with George Rogers Clark came to KY in 1775. He selected a settlement located on Cedar Creek, a branch of Dick’s River (now Dix River) and later returned to Virginia for his family.

Whitley built the first brick house west of the Alleganies. The brick were lad in Flemish Bond design on a place known as Sportsman Hill.

Having an aversion to anything English, he used clay instead of turf for the surface of the oval or circular racetrack

Sportsman Hill Marker (back) image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, April 12, 2017
2. Sportsman Hill Marker (back)
which he laid out in 1788. He raced the horses in a counter-clockwise direction. To this day all American sports using oval tracks race counter-clockwise.

Whitley was killed at the age of 64 in the War of 1812 at the Battle of the Thames. It is thought Whitley killed Tecumseh. The question of Tecumseh’s death may remain a mystery, but the contribution of William Whitley to pioneer KY .is a fact.

The racetrack was so popular with the pioneers of the area that on Oct. 21, 1788 the Lincoln Co. Court ordered that the road from Whitley’s race path to the Lincoln Co. Court House be built.
 
Location. 37° 28.117′ N, 84° 32.95′ W. Marker is near Crab Orchard, Kentucky, in Lincoln County. Marker can be reached from William Whitley Road. Touch for map. Monument is located in the parking lot of the William Whitley House State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Crab Orchard KY 40419, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sportsman's Hill / Whitley House - 1785 (here, next to this marker); Beginning of Horse Racing in Kentucky (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Celebration (about 500 feet away); A Little Bit to Eat at the Race (about 700 feet away);

William Whitley image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse
3. William Whitley
The Legacy of Sportsman’s Hill at Crab Orchard (approx. 0.2 miles away); Where Racing Turned Around (approx. 0.2 miles away); A View from Sportsman’s Hill (approx. ¼ mile away); Sportsman's Hill (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Crab Orchard.
 
Also see . . .
1. William Whitley. (Submitted on May 26, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
2. William Whitley History. (Submitted on May 26, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismSportsWar of 1812
 
Sportsman Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, April 12, 2017
4. Sportsman Hill Marker
Sportsman's Hill as seen from William Whitley House image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, April 12, 2017
5. Sportsman's Hill as seen from William Whitley House
William Whitley House image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, April 12, 2017
6. William Whitley House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 29, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 26, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 84 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 26, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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