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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Howe in Butte County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

John Day’s River

 
 
John Day’s River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 11, 2017
1. John Day’s River Marker
Inscription.
John Day’s River
Fur traders named this stream for John Day, a pioneer trapper who died in the valley north of here, Feb. 16, 1820

John Day had started west with John Jacob Astor’s Pacific Fur Company that discovered Snake River Valley to the south of here in 1811. After 1816 he joined Donald Mackensie’s band of fur hunters who finally spent the winter of 1819-1820 in what is now known as little Lost River Valley. For many years, trappers and mapmakers referred to Mackensie’s campground as on John Day’s River, which is now Little Lost River.
 
Erected by Idaho Historical Society & Idaho Transportation Department. (Marker Number 227.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Idaho State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 43° 47.007′ N, 112° 59.617′ W. Marker is in Howe, Idaho, in Butte County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 33 and N 1480W (County Highway 1480), on the right when traveling west on State Highway 33. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Howe ID 83244, United States of America.
 
Also see . . .  John Day (trapper) on Wikipedia. (Submitted on May 29, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
John Day’s River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 11, 2017
2. John Day’s River Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 29, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 29, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 75 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 29, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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