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Vicksburg National Military Park in Warren County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battle for Vicksburg

 
 
Battle for Vicksburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 25, 2017
1. Battle for Vicksburg Marker
Inscription. During the 19th century, rivers meant trade and transit—none more than the Mississippi. This mighty artery of commerce was the nation's single greatest economic feature. In late 1862, Vicksburg remained the primary Confederate stronghold along the river. Union leaders realized the critical nature of Vicksburg's position, and launched a campaign to strike the Confederate heartland. More than 100,000 soldiers and sailors from 28 states, North and South, fought here in 1863.

After two failed assaults on Vicksburg's defenses, Grant switched to siege tactics to take the city. Union troops kept the Confederates locked in their own city for 47 days. With no hope of supplies or reinforcements from outside, Pemberton finally surrendered. The Stars and Stripes flew over Vicksburg once again on July 4, 1863.

Bottom photo captions:
The Commanders
In 1862, Union General Ulysses S. Grant was ordered to clear the Mississippi River corridor of Confederate resistance.

Confederate General John C. Pemberton was given command of Mississippi and East Louisiana in 1862—including the defense of Vicksburg.

 
Erected by Vicksburg National Military Park.
 
Location. 32° 
'Battle for Vicksburg' Marker in Visitors Center parking lot. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 25, 2017
2. 'Battle for Vicksburg' Marker in Visitors Center parking lot.
20.628′ N, 90° 51.035′ W. Marker is in Vicksburg National Military Park, Mississippi, in Warren County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Union Avenue and Clay Street. Touch for map. Located in the visitors center parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3201 Clay Street, Vicksburg MS 39183, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Vicksburg is the Key (here, next to this marker); Artillery, The King of Battle (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. 1st Battery, (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. 17th Battery. (within shouting distance of this marker); Indiana 1st Brig. 10th Div. 13th Corps (within shouting distance of this marker); 23rd Wisconsin Infantry Camp (within shouting distance of this marker); Indiana Company C, 4th Cavalry. (within shouting distance of this marker); Ohio Ninety Sixth Infantry, (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vicksburg National Military Park.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on the Siege of Vicksburg. (Submitted on June 9, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Visitors Center exhibits (3 of 5). image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, May 25, 2017
3. Visitors Center exhibits (3 of 5).
Confederate Hospital (left): Vicksburg's homes often served as hospitals for sick and wounded Confederate soldiers. This exhibit depicts such a room converted to the office of a surgeon for the Southern troops. Most furnishings are original period pieces; replicas include the Confederate litter, surgical kit, and soldier's jacket. The surgical kit, made by Gemrig of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is typical of those used by doctors of both armies. Field Officer's Tent (middle): This exhibit shows the equipment and accouterments of an army officer's field office. Most furnishings are original, with the exceptions of the replica camp table and tent. Of special interest is the field desk used at Vicksburg by Captain Henry Ede, regimental quartermaster, 81st Illinois Volunteers. Milliken's Bend (right): Black troops were repeatedly cited for heroic conduct in battle and steadfastness under trying field conditions. On June 7, 1863, Milliken's Bend became one of the first such battles, and, in the words of Major General Ulysses S. Grant, was, "The first important engagement of the war in which colored troops were under fire."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 9, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 9, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 72 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 9, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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