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Sandy Spring in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Quakers Practicing their Faith in Montgomery County

1861-1865

 
 
Quakers Practicing their Faith in Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 9, 2017
1. Quakers Practicing their Faith in Montgomery County Marker
Inscription. The Civil War profoundly affected county residents because of their proximity to Washington, D.C. —the Union Capital— and Virginia, the northern reach of the Confederate States of America. No community in Montgomery County was immune to the ravages of this war. Sandy Spring native William Farquhar recorded several occasions when his Quaker community witnessed “the taking of horses by violence, the pillage of stores and personal robbery, [and] had suffered quietly and without resistance.” A significant portion of Sandy Spring's population belonged to the Quaker Religious Society of Friends organization.

Local Quakers were committed Unionists and supported the motives behind the war. But in action, they could not participate on the battlefield due to their testimony against military service. Nonetheless, many contributed in ways that were acceptable to their faith. For example, Quaker women not only submitted articles to the Maryland State Fair for U.S. Soldier Relief in Baltimore that “nobly maintained the reputation of the neighborhood,” they also prepared care packages for needy Confederate women in the South.

Although most Friends were committed to non-violent involvement in the war, a noticeable minority did engage in battle. By the end of the Civil War,
Quakers Practicing their Faith in Montgomery County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 9, 2017
2. Quakers Practicing their Faith in Montgomery County Marker
the Quaker Baltimore Yearly Meeting in Maryland understood that some members had violated the pacifist principle, but decided to seek a “lenient course” for violators rather than disown them, a measure deemed too severe considering the goal to preserve the Union and eradicate slavery.

Even after the close of the long rebellion, some Quakers felt hard pressed to let their feelings of conflict subside. In her 1868 diary, Sandy Spring resident Mary Brooke became quite heated over her thoughts about former Confederate neighbors: “ I cannot force myself, to feel any unity of desire of intercourse, having no reason to think they do not still cherish their rebel principles as warmly and strongly as when he (Guy Dorsey) was in the rebel army and piloting them through this very neighborhood, it is very hard to feel charity and love for a traitor; even if we could believe they were under the delusion of honest, conscious convictions, therefore I would avoid voluntary intercourse, at the same time if neighborly assistance was needed in any way, I would freely bestow it, as on any others, of the human family, having thus relieved my mind, I drop the subject forever.” — Mary Briggs Brooke Diary, 1868. University of Maryland Special Collections.
 
Location.
Sand Spring Meeting House image. Click for full size.
John O. Bostrup (Library of Congress, HABS), August 5, 1936
3. Sand Spring Meeting House
Built in 1817, the Sandy Spring Meeting House remains a place for local Friends to come together for silent contemplation.
39° 7.734′ N, 77° 1.55′ W. Marker is in Sandy Spring, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Norwood Road. Touch for map. At Woodlawn Manor Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 16501 Norwood Road, Sandy Spring MD 20860, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Woodlawn (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); African Americans and Quakers in Sandy Spring (about 500 feet away); The Holland Red Door Store (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Sandy Spring (approx. 0.8 miles away); History of the Sandy Spring Friends Meeting House (approx. 1.3 miles away); Sandy Spring Friends Meeting Site (approx. 1.3 miles away); Higgins Tavern (approx. 2.4 miles away); Olney House (approx. 2.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sandy Spring.
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.War, US Civil
 
Quaker Guns image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Quaker Guns
One of the most tactical weapons used during the Civil War was the Quaker gun. Deceiving in its appearance, it gave fortifications the look of being well armed. Without firing power, it was simply a painted wooden log that resembled a loaded cannon.
The “Invasion” of the North image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 9, 2017
5. The “Invasion” of the North
This 1862 cartoon depicts an ‘Old Quaker Lady of Maryland’ pleading with Rebel scouts, “If thou wants my house, Friend, thou may'st have it but oh! do wash thyself before entering in.” it alludes to their pacifist spirit and characteristic language.
Close-up of image on marker
Sandy Spring and Woodlawn image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 9, 2017
6. Sandy Spring and Woodlawn
1865 Martinet and Bond Map with Sandy Spring Meeting House location indicated.
Close-up of map on marker
Dr. William P. Palmer image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 9, 2017
7. Dr. William P. Palmer
Quaker William Palmer, the owner of Woodlawn, was read out of his Quaker Meeting for owning slaves in 1835.
Close-up of photo on signage at Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park
Document reading Dr. Palmer out of the Indian Spring Monthly Meeting. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 9, 2017
8. Document reading Dr. Palmer out of the Indian Spring Monthly Meeting.
“Whereas William P. Palmer has had a right of membership in our Religious Society, but having failed to Support our Testimony against Slavery,... we therefore disown him as being any longer a member.”
Close-up of photo on signage at Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park
“The Inner Light” image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 9, 2017
9. “The Inner Light”
1988 bronze statue by Marcia Billig at Woodlawn.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 9, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 92 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 9, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on June 10, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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