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Aldie in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Mosby-Forbes Engagement July 6, 1864

 

—American Civil War 1861 - 1865 —

 
The Mosby Forbes Engagement, July 6, 1864 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 12, 2017
1. The Mosby Forbes Engagement, July 6, 1864 Marker
Inscription. The Battle of Mt. Zion Church began just east of here in the late afternoon hours of July 6, 1864, as Confederate Lieutenant Colonel John Singleton Mosby's artillery struck Union cavalry under Major William Hathaway Forbes. Amid a rousing “rebel yell” Confederate Rangers swooped down on detachments of the 2nd Massachusetts and 13th New York Cavalries. Forbes gallantly tried to rally his confused men as he rushed at Mosby swinging his saber. In the heat of the battle, Forbes' attack missed Mosby as a Confederate Ranger Tom Richards intervened between the two commanders, misfiring his pistol directly in Forbes' face. Unharmed Forbes turns on Richards with his saber, thrusting with such force that his sword was embedded in the Confederate's shoulder and wrenched from Forbes' hand. At the same moment, Mosby fired a pistol at Forbes, missed and hit Forbes' horse, “Beauregard,” pinning Forbes beneath his dying mount. Coming to the defense of Forbes, bugler A. P. Walker of the 2nd Massachusetts brushed aside another pistol leveled at Forbes, and he and “Fighting Major” surrendered. Mosby reported one killed and six wounded. Major Forbes was paroled at the end of 1864, and returned home until “exchanged” in April 1865 in time to see action at Saylors Creek and Appomatox. Ironically, the Forbes and
The Mosby Forbes Engagement, July 6, 1864 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 12, 2017
2. The Mosby Forbes Engagement, July 6, 1864 Marker
The “The Mosby Forbes Engagement” is on the left.
Mosby families began a friendship after the war that made them close business and political allies for more than 30 years.
 
Location. 38° 57.806′ N, 77° 36.559′ W. Marker is in Aldie, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Lee Jackson Memorial Highway (U.S. 50) and Watson Road (Virginia Route 860), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. At Mt. Zion Old School Baptist Church. Marker is at or near this postal address: 40319 Lee Jackson Memorial Highway, Aldie VA 20105, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Fog of War (here, next to this marker); Elders of the Mount Zion Old School Baptist Church (a few steps from this marker); Mt. Zion Historic Park (a few steps from this marker); Mt. Zion Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Mt. Zion Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Mt. Zion Old School Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Mother of Stonewall Jackson (approx. 1.1 miles away); President Monroe’s Home (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Aldie.
 
Mosby Forbes Engagement by J. Lindsay image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 12, 2017
3. Mosby Forbes Engagement by J. Lindsay
Col. Mosby shoots Maj. Forbes' horse “Beauregard”
Close-up of image on marker
Graves of 12 Union Soldiers Killed in the July 6 encounter near Mt. Zion Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 12, 2017
4. Graves of 12 Union Soldiers Killed in the July 6 encounter near Mt. Zion Church
12 Union Cavalrymen of the 2nd Mass. Regiment and the 13th New York killed at the Battle of Mt. Zion were originally buried in a mass grave at Mt. Zion Cemetery. These headstones were placed in the cemetery in June 1997 to honor them.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 15, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 77 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 15, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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