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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Navy Yard in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Willard Park

 
 
Willard Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2008
1. Willard Park Marker
The displays have been substantially re-arranged since the marker text was written. Some displays have been removed and placed into storage pending relocation to a new "Cold War" exhibit.
Inscription. On display in Willard Park, named for the early 20th century commandant of the Yard, are over 60 naval artifacts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Mounted at the western end of the park is a fine collection of turn-of-the-century naval ordnance from both American and European manufacturers. Nearby are several large artifacts salvaged from the battleship Maine sunk on the eve of the Spanish-American War. Farther east are naval landing force guns surrounding German and American deck guns, one of which fired the first American shot of World War I. Also from that war is the last of eight 14-inch naval railway batteries. World War II artifacts include the propeller from the battleship South Dakota, the Navy's first radar antenna, and armor plate from Japanese and American warships. A 16-inch gun barrel rests on specially designed trucks which once moved these huge guns through the Yard. At the east end of the park, artifacts from the post war era include a Regulus missile, a Terrier battery, a Sparrowhawk launcher, and a five-inch gun barrel which saw service in Vietnam. The Navy's continuing role in oceanography is commemorated by the NOMAD remote sensor platform and the titanium pressure sphere from the bathyscaphe, Alvin.
 
Location. 38° 52.363′ N, 76° 
6 inch - 30 caliber gun from the USS Maine image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2008
2. 6 inch - 30 caliber gun from the USS Maine
59.749′ W. Marker is in Navy Yard, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Sicard Street, SE, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is inside the Washington Navy Yard, at the center of Willard Park. Marker is in this post office area: Washington Navy Yard DC 20374, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Navy Gun Car (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Navy Yard Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); National Museum of the U.S. Navy (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Willard Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome Aboard the Display Ship BARRY (DD-993)(sic) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Frank W. Crilley Building (about 400 feet away); U.S. Experimental Model Basin (about 400 feet away); Marine Railway - Experimental Model Basin (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Navy Yard.
 
Also see . . .  VAdm. Arthur L. Willard. (Submitted on February 9, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Military
 
Alvin Pressure Sphere and Propeller Blade from USS Maine image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2008
3. Alvin Pressure Sphere and Propeller Blade from USS Maine
USS South Dakota Propeller image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2008
4. USS South Dakota Propeller
The propeller weighs 36,000 pounds. Built at Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1939, the propeller was designed to turn at 179 revolutions per minute, giving the battleship a speed of 28 knots.
16inch Mark II Gun image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2008
5. 16inch Mark II Gun
Designed as a battleship gun, this version saw no active service. Later developments of similar 16-inch guns would serve on World War II battleships. The Army received a few Mark II 16-inch guns for use in coastal defenses.
Japanese Armor Plate image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2008
6. Japanese Armor Plate
Intended for a Japanese battleship, this armor plate was captured at the end of World War II. The Navy used for tests to determine the true striking power of a 16-inch gun battleship gun.
Battleship Armor image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2008
7. Battleship Armor
Sections of armor plate from the battleship USS South Dakota
Guns from the CSS Atlanta image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 1, 2008
8. Guns from the CSS Atlanta
Among the trophies in Willard Park are four guns from the ironclad CSS Atlanta. The Atlanta was captured off the coast of Georgia near Savannah in 1863 following a duel with two Federal ironclads. Pressed into Federal service, after the war she was scrapped. These guns are early production Brooke Rifles cast at Tredegar Iron Works, Richmond, Virginia. Their single bands give a very similar appearance to Federal Parrott Rifles.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,396 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on August 18, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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