Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Revolutionary War

Firewood

 
 
Revolutionary War- Firewood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 9, 2015
1. Revolutionary War- Firewood Marker
Inscription. Wood was the primary heating fuel used by Soldiers during the Revolutionary War. Soldiers received a ration of one-half of a cord of wood per room per day. Officers had better quarters than enlisted men. A Colonel, for example, would have two rooms, while twelve enlisted men would share one room. In the Philadelphia region of Pennsylvania, the Continental Army provided wood for heating for a period of 26 weeks out of the year.

Elementary School Questions:
1. If a cord of wood measures 8 feet across, 4 feet deep, and 4 feet high, what is the volume of a cord of wood in cubic feet and cubic yards?
2. Use the information above to figure out how many cords of woods 576 enlisted men will need to stay warm for 4 weeks. How many would they need for an entire 26 week winter season?
3. Pennsylvania temperatures are mild compared to what men from New York and New England were used to but cold enough for men living in tents or huts to need heat. Given this temperature chart for February, what are the mean, median and mode temperature for the month of February? What is the range in temperatures for the month of February? Create a Line plot (dot plot) to organize and represent the data. (Chart follows)

Middle School Questions:
1. If 25 cords of wood will supply 600 men for one week, how many men will

Insert - Washington at winter quarters image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 9, 2015
2. Insert - Washington at winter quarters
48 cords of wood supply for the same period? Use proportions to solve this problem.
2. A camp started with 56 cords of wood. 25% of the wood has been used. How many cords of wood were used?
3. A group of enlisted men are allotted ½ a cord of wood a week for heating their one room cabin. The previous company of Soldiers left a surplus of 2 cords of wood. Create an equation in slope intercept form to model the situation.

High School Questions:
1. A General uses the same number of cords of wood each week. After five weeks in camp, he has used 7.5 cords of wood, and after 11 weeks he has used 16.5 cords of wood. Write an equation to model this arithmetic sequence.
2. Graph this situation and interpret the slope coefficient and the y-intercept.
3. Use your equation to predict the number of cords the General will need for 26 weeks. Calculate how many rooms the General occupied.

An answer key and list of relevant PA Educational Standards is available in the Museum Store inside the Visitor and Education center. Funding for this sign provided by the G.B. Stuart Charitable Foundation.
 
Erected by U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
 
Location. 40° 12.233′ N, 77° 9.475′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in

Insert - Reenactors at Valley Forge image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 9, 2015
3. Insert - Reenactors at Valley Forge
Cumberland County. Marker can be reached from Army Heritage Drive. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Respect (here, next to this marker); Technical History (within shouting distance of this marker); The Capture of Redoubt #10 (within shouting distance of this marker); Personal Courage (within shouting distance of this marker); Corporal Eugene C. Rivera (within shouting distance of this marker); Defender of Pusan (within shouting distance of this marker); Smallpox (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Smallpox (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Categories. EducationWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 22, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 22, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 137 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 22, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A wide shot of the marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?
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