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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Floydada in Floyd County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Battle of Blanco Canyon

 
 
The Battle of Blanco Canyon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 7, 2017
1. The Battle of Blanco Canyon Marker
Inscription. Of all the confrontations between the United States Army and Indians in Texas, the Battle of Blanco Canyon is identified as one of the most decisive clashes in the U.S. cavalry’s campaigns against the Comanches. Indians inhabited the canyons and plains as far back as 12,000 years, and various bands and tribes populated what is now Floyd County due to the area’s abundant resources. In 1720, the Comanche Indians traveled into north Texas which drove the Apache and other tribes south. The Comanche maintained strong diplomatic and military power over Texas, and by 1790 the Comanche proved to be powerful trading figures in the region.

On Aug. 12, 1871, an Indian agent, Lawrie Tatum, requested that Gen. Benjamin Grierson and Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie lead an expedition against Kotsoteka and Quahadi Comanche bands whom denied relocation to a reservation. On Oct. 3, the command left Camp Cooper (Throckmorton County) with Tonkawa scouts to find chief Quanah Parker and the accompanying Indians. During the Battle of Blanco Canyon, a preemptive attack against the cavalry by Parker’s forces on Oct. 10 in which the Indians drove off many cavalry horses, Col. Mackenzie’s men suffered one fatality. In response, Col. Mackenzie and Lt. Robert G. Carter pursued the Comanches. During the expedition, Lt. Carter’s leg was crushed when his horse slipped
The Battle of Blanco Canyon Marker <i>on the right</i> image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 7, 2017
2. The Battle of Blanco Canyon Marker on the right
Three historical markers in background are; Roots of the Catholic Faith in West Texas, Coronado in Blanco Canyon and The Battle of Blanco Canyon.
and Col. Mackenzie was shot in the leg when returning to Blanco Canyon. The expedition ended soon after the wounded and sick retreated on Oct. 24. The command marched 509 miles in total, and although the expedition discouraged Col. Mackenzie, the cavalry destroyed Comanche resources and disrupted regional Comanche dominance.
 
Erected 2013 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17646.)
 
Location. 33° 53.525′ N, 101° 21.601′ W. Marker is near Floydada, Texas, in Floyd County. Marker is on U.S. 62, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in roadside park, 7 miles south of Floydada. Marker is in this post office area: Floydada TX 79235, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Coronado in Blanco Canyon (here, next to this marker); Roots of the Catholic Faith in West Texas (here, next to this marker); Floyd County (a few steps from this marker); Floydada, Texas (approx. 6.1 miles away); Zimmerman House (approx. 6.2 miles away); First Baptist Church of Floydada (approx. 6.4 miles away); First Methodist Church of Floydada (approx. 6.4 miles away); Floydada Lodge No. 712, A. F. & A. M. (approx. 6.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Floydada.
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
The Battle of Blanco Canyon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 7, 2017
3. The Battle of Blanco Canyon Marker
View north in roadside park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 28, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 28, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 79 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 28, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.
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