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Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lieutenant Colonel William Orlando Darby

 
 
Lieutenant Colonel William Orlando Darby Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 11, 2012
1. Lieutenant Colonel William Orlando Darby Marker
Inscription. William Orlando Darby was born on February 9, 1911. He grew up in Fort Smith, Arkansas. He was a former Boy Scout and was an excellent student. Darby attended the United States Military Academy at West Point. He graduated in 1933 as a Second Lieutenant and served in a variety of Field artillery assignments before the war.

At the start of World War II, Darby became a member of the 34th infantry Division. Darby’s unit went to Northern Ireland for extensive training to prepare for combat against the Germans. During his training, Darby was impressed with the highly trained and experienced British Commandos. General George Marshall, Chief of Staff, saw the advantages of creating a unit like the British Commandos. After a visit to their training depot, he decided to create the American equivalent, the Rangers. Darby’s interest in the British Commandos made him a perfect candidate to form the Army’s 1st Ranger Battalion, the initial Ranger unit in the war. Most of the first volunteers for the Rangers came from the 34th Infantry Division. About 50 of his Rangers participated with the British Commandos in the ill-fated Dieppe Raid on August 19, 1942. The next month, the battalion became part of the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division. “Darby’s Rangers” first saw action, as a unit, in North Africa during Operation Torch. During an

Insert - Colonel Darby image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 11, 2012
2. Insert - Colonel Darby
amphibious landing at Arzew in Tunisia, the Rangers took two gun batteries in a night attack with few casualties. The battalion later participated in the invasion of Sicily. His unit also saw extensive action in Italy and participated in several amphibious landings. Darby received the Distinguished Service Cross twice and the Silver Star. He was killed in action on April 30, 1945.
 
Erected by U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
 
Location. 40° 12.283′ N, 77° 9.513′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker can be reached from Army Heritage Drive. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonel Robert W. Black (here, next to this marker); General Francis “Swamp Fox” Marion (here, next to this marker); Specialist Fourth Class Robert D. Law (a few steps from this marker); A Century of Protection (within shouting distance of this marker); Pine Cottage (within shouting distance of this marker); Stations Upon the Road (within shouting distance of this marker);
Insert - Colonel Darby chowing down image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 11, 2012
3. Insert - Colonel Darby chowing down
Smallpox (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Smallpox (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Regarding Lieutenant Colonel William Orlando Darby. The photographs all show Darby as a full Colonel.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 3, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 3, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 61 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 3, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
 
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