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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
South Newport in McIntosh County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County

 
 
The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 2008
1. The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County Marker
Inscription. The service of this family to America, since the first of the Clan, with their leader, Captain John McIntosh Mohr, came from the Highlands of Scotland to Georgia, in 1736, forms a brilliant record.

The roll of distinguished members of this family includes: Gen. Lachlan McIntosh, Col. William McIntosh, Col. John McIntosh, Maj. Lachlan McIntosh - officers in the Revolution; Col. James L. McIntosh, killed in the Mexican War; Maria J. McIntosh, authoress; Capt. John McIntosh, Capt. Wm. McIntosh of Mallow, Capt. Roderick (Rory) McIntosh - British Army officers serving in the War with Spain and in the Indian country; George M. Troup, Governor of Georgia; John McIntosh Kell, Second officer of the Alabama; Thomas Spalding of Sapelo; Creek Indian Chiefs - Gen. Wm. McIntosh, Roley McIntosh, Judge Alexander McIntosh, Acee Blue Eagle . . . . and many others.
 
Erected 1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 095-11.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 31° 37.128′ N, 81° 24.075′ W. Marker is in South Newport, Georgia, in McIntosh County. Marker is on Coastal/Ocean Highway (U.S. 17), on the right when traveling
The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
2. The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County Marker
south. Touch for map. Marker is 1.7 miles south of the South Newport River. Marker is in this post office area: Townsend GA 31331, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. William Bartram Trail ( here, next to this marker); Jonesville ( approx. 1.1 miles away); South Newport Baptist Church ( approx. 1.3 miles away); Confederate Post in 1864 ( approx. 1.5 miles away); Skirmish in Bulltown Swamp ( approx. 2.8 miles away); Rice Hope ( approx. 4.8 miles away); John Houstoun McIntosh ( approx. 4.8 miles away); Mallow Plantation ( approx. 5.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in South Newport.
 
Regarding The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County. William McIntosh of the Creek Nation, is actually Lachlan and William McIntosh's cousin. The half Creek, half white leader William MacIntosh was the son of Capt. William MacIntosh, a Tory in the Revolutionary War and the son of Capt. John MacIntosh.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. The General Lachlan McIntosh Historical Marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Lachlan McIntosh. (Submitted on August 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County Marker at Family Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 2008
3. The McIntosh Family Of McIntosh County Marker at Family Cemetery

2. Wikipedia entry for William McIntosh. ...sent into the Creek Nation to recruit them to fight for the British during the Revolutionary War. (Submitted on August 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. Commander John McIntosh Kell, Confederate States Navy, (1823-1900). Dept. Of The Navy (Submitted on August 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraHeroesMilitaryNotable PersonsSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
The McIntosh Family Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
4. The McIntosh Family Cemetery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,233 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 20, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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