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Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands
 

Bet van Beeren

 
 
Bet van Beeren Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 18, 2017
1. Bet van Beeren Marker
Inscription. Bet van Beeren (1902-1967) dreef hier van 1927 tot haar dood Café 't Mandje. Zij was openlijk lesbienne en maakte daarmee 't Mandje het eerste Amsterdamse homo-vriendelijke café. Vanuit heel de wereld bezochten mensen dit kleine café.

Bet van Beeren (1902-1967) ran Café 't Mandje here from 1927 until her death. She was openly lesbian thus making 't Mandje the first gay friendly bar in Amsterdam. People came from all over the world to visit this little bar.
 
Erected by IAmsterdam.
 
Location. 52° 22.489′ N, 4° 54.054′ E. Marker is in Amsterdam, North Holland. Marker is on Zeedijk just north of Stormsteeg, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Zeedijk 63, Amsterdam, North Holland 1012 AS, Netherlands.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Henry Hudson (about 210 meters away, measured in a direct line); Chet Baker (about 210 meters away); Schreierstoren (about 210 meters away); Anthoniespoort / St. Anthony's Gate (about 240 meters away); Municipal Morgue (approx. half a kilometer away); Hendrick de Keyser
Café 't Mandje with Bet van Beeren Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 17, 2017
2. Café 't Mandje with Bet van Beeren Marker
(approx. 0.7 kilometers away); Jacobus Henricus van 't Hoff (approx. 0.7 kilometers away); Franz Liszt (approx. 0.8 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Amsterdam.
 
Also see . . .  Bet van Beeren (Wikipedia). Bet van Beeren (12 February 1902—16 July 1967) was a flamboyant, legendary bar owner in Amsterdam. While hers wasn't the first bar that allowed LGBT persons to openly associate, the fact that she was openly lesbian, and accepting of a very diverse clientele, led her establishment to be one of the most known. In 2017, she was honored by the city of Amsterdam when a canal bridge was renamed in her honor. (Submitted on July 7, 2017.) 
 
Additional keywords. LGBT
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWomen
 
Bet van Beeren Portrait Displayed in the Window of Café 't Mandje image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 18, 2017
3. Bet van Beeren Portrait Displayed in the Window of Café 't Mandje
Making a lot of money from the pub, van Beeren was known for her charitable works, helping the poor, children and the elderly. She also claimed to have paid for one of the crosses atop the Nicholaas Church. Among her other legendary deeds, she allowed the bar to be used as an arms depot for the Dutch resistance during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands. While homosexual men became targets of the Germans, van Beeren's pub was off-limits to German troops because of its reputation as a red-light district establishment. The use of the term "owl" for heterosexuals has been attributed to a device van Beeren used when the bar was being raided or when homophobic patrols were sweeping the area. She had a light installed in a plaster owl, which was lit to warn her customers. She hung neckties and souvenirs from patrons from the ceiling, held dances on Queen's Day where same sex couples could dance together, and on Fridays would let the Salvation Army band come in to raise funds for charity. - Wikipedia
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 7, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 61 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 7, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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