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Thomaston in Knox County, Maine — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Revere Bell

Knox Museum

 
 
The Revere Bell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2017
1. The Revere Bell Marker
Inscription.
American Patriot Paul Revere is best known for his midnight ride on April 18, 1775, warning colonists of the advancing British forces. Although generations of people know Revere as an American hero, others know him as a noted silver and goldsmith, a trade he learned from his father and passed on to his son.
          In 1787, the Paul Revere and Son Foundry expanded their metalworking to include iron and brass firebacks, weights, metal for shipbuilding, cannons, and bells. The Foundry cast 959 bells between 1792 and 1828. Paul Revere cast his last bell in 1811, at the age of 76.
          In 1791, Henry Knox paid $625.00 to purchase a bell for the Congregational Meeting House that once stood on the parcel of land just beyond the present front gate of the Knox Museum. The bell later cracked and was recast by the Foundry in 1822. In 1964, the Meeting House was demolished and the bell became the property of the Knox Memorial Association which, along with the General Knox Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution, spearheaded the project to rebuild Montpelier as a “Fitting Memorial to Revolutionary War General and First Secretary of War, Henry Knox.”
          M.M. Springer memorialized the Revere bell and the life of General Henry Knox with the poem “North Parish Bell”, an excerpt of which
The Revere Bell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2017
2. The Revere Bell Marker
appears below:
Twas the hand of the General that placed me here,
In the days when the land was young.
I was born in the foundry of Paul Revere,
and I speak with a mighty tongue.
I pealed out a welcome to Royal guests,
I rang for the blushing bride,
I rang, when they christened a bonny babe,
And I tolled, when the General died.”

 
Erected 2016 by Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Location. 44° 4.866′ N, 69° 10.117′ W. Marker is in Thomaston, Maine, in Knox County. Marker is at the intersection of High Street (Maine Route 131) and Main Street (U.S. 1), on the left when traveling south on High Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in front of the Knox Mansion. Marker is at or near this postal address: 30 High Street, Thomaston ME 04861, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Meeting House (within shouting distance of this marker); General Henry Knox’s Estate (within shouting distance of this marker); Encampment Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Terraces, Overlook and Allées (within shouting distance of this marker); The Oval Garden and Willow Pond
The Revere Bell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2017
3. The Revere Bell Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Heirloom Vegetable and Fruit Garden, Barn and Orchard (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Welcome to Thomaston, Maine, the Town That Went to Sea (approx. 0.7 miles away); The Builders, the Captains and the Seamen of Thomaston Ships (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Thomaston.
 
More about this marker. A picture of the Congregational Meeting House and an aerial photo of the Knox Estate area appear on the marker.
 
Also see . . .  Henry Knox Museum. (Submitted on July 15, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
The Revere Bell image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2017
4. The Revere Bell
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 15, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 60 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 15, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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