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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Scranton in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Shops

 
 
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Shops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 25, 2008
1. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Shops Marker
Inscription. In 1907 William Truesdale, president of the DL&W, hired architect Frank J. Niles of New Jersey to replace the original locomotive shops. Niles designed four new structures: A five story pattern shop, a foundry, a blacksmith shop, and a locomotive erection shop.

At its peak in 1910 almost 2000 men worked at the shops. DL&W continued to repair and manufacture locomotive equipment at this site until 1951. As new modes of transportation replaced the railroad, work declined. When DL&W sold the site to the government in 1951, 1300 men worked in the shops.

Across Ceder Avenue at the present site of the General Dynamics works, once stood one of the Lackawanna Iron and Steel Company's Rolling mills and steel mills. LI&S shared the site with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad shops until 1901, when LI&S dismantled its buildings, and left Scranton for Lackawanna, New York.
 
Location. 41° 24.219′ N, 75° 39.824′ W. Marker is in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in Lackawanna County. Marker is at the intersection of Cedar Avenue and Mattes Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Cedar Avenue. Touch for map. Located at the Scranton's Iron Furnace Park. Marker is in this post office area: Scranton PA 18505, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Shops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 25, 2008
2. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Shops Marker
Stands next to the road at the exhibit circle.
walking distance of this marker. Scranton's Iron Furnace (a few steps from this marker); Lackawanna Iron (a few steps from this marker); The Blast Furnaces (a few steps from this marker); Scranton Iron Furnaces (within shouting distance of this marker); Supplying the Blast (within shouting distance of this marker); Casting Iron (within shouting distance of this marker); Rolling and Puddling (within shouting distance of this marker); Making Steel (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Scranton.
 
More about this marker. On the left side of the marker is Amsden's map of Scranton, 1857. In the center a photo shows The Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Scranton Freight Yards During the Strike of 1877. In the lower center is Ward's map of Scranton. On the upper right is a photo of the DL&W car shops. Below that is a line drawing of The "W. Dawson," the first engine built by Scranton Shops, 1869.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad. This site offers maps of the rail lines used by the railroad, interfaced with Google maps. (Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. A History of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western.
Site of the Steel Works image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Site of the Steel Works
The steel works were located on the site presently occupied by the General Dynamics plant. Today the plant is an armaments production factory.
(Submitted on August 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
The Railyard Today image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
4. The Railyard Today
Portions of the old railway are within Steamtown National Historic Site.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,342 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on August 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on August 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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