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Old Pleasant Hill in De Soto Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Welcome to Old Pleasant Hill

 
 
Welcome to Old Pleasant Hill Monument (Front) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
1. Welcome to Old Pleasant Hill Monument (Front)
Inscription.
Front
You are standing on the corner of Main and 1st Streets downtown. The stores and shops were mostly to your left and behind you along Main Street. Some were along 1st Street. About 150 feet to your left was 2nd Street etc. Houses were scattered block by block in all directions from here.

Imagine you were standing here at about 4:30 pm Saturday April 9, 1864. The sound of musket fire, cannons, horses running, clanking of equipment, shouts of orders and screams of wounded men is deafening. Thousands of Yankee solders are running past in various directions as regiments move to new positions to meet the onslaught of the Confederates converging on this spot from three directions.

The Confederate cavalry is dismounted to your right rear. General Churchill's Confederate Arkansas and Missouri divisions are charging in directly behind you and to your left rear. General Walker's Texas division should be in view charging into town, down the Mansfield Road, Main Street and to its right, General Green's dismounted Confederate cavalry is making its way through the woods to your left front and General Polinac's Louisiana and Texas division is coming in more slowly to your left and in front of you way back in the woods. You are standing in a very dangerous place. Bullets are whizzing past you. Cannonballs
Welcome to Old Pleasant Hill Monument (Rear) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
2. Welcome to Old Pleasant Hill Monument (Rear)
are screaming overhead, some exploding close by.

Military activity has been heavy in and through town for a week or so with General Taylor's confederate army concentrating here then falling back to Mansfield. The Yankee cavalry rode into town on the 7th, fighting the Confederate cavalry through town for about 2 miles to Dr. Wilson's farm where the Confederates stopped for a good size fight then they slowly fell back fighting off and on to Sabine Crossroads this side of Mansfield. The Yankee twenty mile long wagon train began passing through on the 7th and all day on the 8th with Yankee soldiers trying to get past it to where General Taylor's army was slaughtering the Yankee cavalry at Sabine Crossroads on the 8th. Most of the Yankee infantry arrived here during the night of the 8th from Grand Ecore and began digging in to get ready for the Confederates. They skirmished around the town all day on the 9th then all hell broke loose around 4 pm. The battle continued for over 2 hours in and around the town. About dark the Confederates fell back about 2 miles. The Yankees pulled out during the night, leaving the dead and wounded were they fell.

Rear
A terrible sight met the eyes of those who braved the field of carnage on that Sunday morning. Many thousands of dead, dying and wounded men lying as far as the eyes could see intermixed with well over
Welcome to Old Pleasant Hill Monument image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
3. Welcome to Old Pleasant Hill Monument
a thousand dead horses, broken and scattered equipment, etc. The activity in Pleasant Hill continued. The dead soldiers had to be buried, the wounded tended, the dead horses burned, the thousands of muskets and other scattered usable equipment gathered and the mess cleaned up. Scattered items, spent and dropped bullets, cannonball fragments, etc. are still being picked up here and there today 130 years later.

There would be more deadly fighting for the armies as the Yankees extracted themselves from the Red River Campaign. General Bank's army to the south, General Steel's army to the north and Admiral Porter's fleet on the river but the Battle for Shreveport and threatened invasion of Texas was over.
 
Location. 31° 51.235′ N, 93° 30.807′ W. Marker is in Old Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, in De Soto Parish. Marker is at the intersection of Parish Road 1068 and State Route 175, on the left when traveling north on Parish Road 1068. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 23271 LA-175, Pelican LA 71063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. War for Southern Independence (within shouting distance of this marker); Pleasant Hill Battlefield (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters Department of the Gulf / Headquarters Trans-Mississippi Dept. (within shouting distance of this marker); Account of the Battle of Pleasant Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Pleasant Hill Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Pleasant Hill Battle Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Pleasant Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate and Union Soldier Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Old Pleasant Hill.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on the Battle of Pleasant Hill. (Submitted on July 23, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 23, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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