Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Good Hope in Fayette County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient

 
 
David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 28, 2017
1. David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker
Side A
Inscription.
Side A
The Good Hope Cemetery is the final resting place for veterans of many of America's wars, including David Jones. Jones earned the Medal of Honor as a member of Company I of the 54th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Union Army. During Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's Vicksburg Campaign, Jones volunteered for a mission known as the "Forlorn Hope." It was the lead assault of a major attack and meant certain death or wounding for soldiers in the attacking party. Jones' Forlorn Hope was part of Grant's attempt on May 22, 1863 to storm Vicksburg's defenses and take the city, avoiding a siege. The attack did not succeed. Of the 150 soldiers who volunteered for the assault, many were killed or wounded, including Jones. After a 47 day siege, Vicksburg surrendered on July 4, 1863—the same day as the Union's victory at Gettysburg.

Side B
According to Jones' pension application "his head became badly and permanently injured from concussion of cannon fire with a storming party to capture Fort Pemberton, then held by the enemy at Vicksburg, Mississippi. The mouth of the cannon was within four or five feet of [Jones] in said Fort where [he] and others were compelled to remain all day in the hot sun and suffering from incessant firing of cannon by the enemy... [Jones] and his comrades who were still alive then,

David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 28, 2017
2. David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker
Side B
could not retreat until after night, for reason that they all would have been killed by the enemy." After the war, Jones returned to Good Hope for the rest of his life. He married Rosellie A. Smith in 1865, fathered six children, and was a highly respected member of the community.
 
Erected 2010 by Fayette County Travel and Toursim and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number OHS 8- 24.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients, and the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 26.877′ N, 83° 22.199′ W. Marker is near Good Hope, Ohio, in Fayette County. Marker can be reached from Cemetery Road (County Route 203). Touch for map. marker is in Good Hope Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7000 St Rt 753 SE, Greenfield OH 45123, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wayne Township Veterans Memorial (a few steps from this marker); West Settlement and Abolition Lane (approx. 6.3 miles away); B&O and DT&I Railroad Depots (approx. 6.6 miles away); Smith Tannery (approx. 6.6 miles away); Travellers Rest Inn
David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 28, 2017
3. David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker
full view of marker, looking west from lane, into cemetery
(approx. 6.7 miles away); Corner Pharmacy (approx. 6.7 miles away); Soldiers’ Row (approx. 6.7 miles away); World War I Memorial (approx. 6.7 miles away).
 
Additional keywords. Medal of Honor
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 28, 2017
4. David Jones: Medal of Honor Recipient Marker
marker as seen from maple lane, leading into cemetery from State Road
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 31, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 29, 2017, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 38 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 29, 2017, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement