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Lubbock in Lubbock County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients

City of Lubbock Cemetery

 
 
Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 9, 2017
1. Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients Marker
Inscription. In 1861, shortly after the first shots of the Civil War, America established the Congressional Medal of Honor. Given for extraordinary valor and sacrifice, it is the highest military decoration presented by the U.S. Government. Three medal recipients are memorialized at the City of Lubbock Cemetery.

In 1891, Sgt. Joseph F. Knight led a bold rescue of a cavalry company surrounded by hostile Sioux warriors. Knight led the attack resulting in the warriors' retreat, ultimately saving the lives of the cavalry troopers.

In 1945, PFC. Herman C. Wallace was clearing a road when he stepped on a German anti-personnel mine. Diving for the ground would cause the mine to kill those around him. Wallace put both feet on the mine, confining the explosion., sacrificing his life, and saving a number of his comrades from death and injury.

Major George A Davis, a decorated WWII ace fighter pilot, also served in the Korean War. In 1952, Davis bravely attacked 12 enemy aircraft to protect exposed allied support aircraft. Davis brought down two enemy planes, protected the ground support airplanes, and died when his own airplane succumbed to enemy fire.
 
Erected 2013 by Lubbock County Historical Commission.
 
Location. 33° 33.831′ 
Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 9, 2017
2. Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients Marker
N, 101° 48.883′ W. Marker is in Lubbock, Texas, in Lubbock County. Touch for map. Marker is in the southwest corner of the cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2011 East 31st Street, Lubbock TX 79404, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. City of Lubbock Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Buddy Holly Historical Marker (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bradford Knapp (approx. 0.4 miles away); Mount Gilead Baptist Church (approx. one mile away); Breedlove Airport (approx. 1.1 miles away); J.I. Allison House circa 1950s (approx. 1.9 miles away); F W & D South Plains Railway Depot (approx. 1.9 miles away); Buddy Holly (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lubbock.
 
Also see . . .
1. Find A Grave memorial for Joseph F. Knight. (Submitted on August 1, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.)
2. Find A Grave memorial for Herman C. Wallace. (Submitted on August 1, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.)
3. Find A Grave memorial for George A Davis. (Submitted on August 1, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.)
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, KoreanWar, World IIWars, US Indian
 
Sgt. Joseph F. Knight-Indian Campaign Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient-grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 16, 2003
3. Sgt. Joseph F. Knight-Indian Campaign Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient-grave marker
He is buried in Block 25, Lot 20. The grave GPS is N33.5652 W101.8084. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: KNIGHT, JOSEPH F. Rank and organization: Sergeant, Troop F, 6th U.S. Cavalry Place and date: At White River, S. Dak., 1 January 1891 Date of issue: 1 May 1891 Citation: Led the advance in a spirited movement to the assistance of Troop K, 6th U.S. Cavalry.
PFC. Herman C. Wallace-World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient-grave marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 16, 2003
4. PFC. Herman C. Wallace-World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient-grave marker
He is buried in Block 41, Lot 2. The grave GPS is N33.5654 W101.8101. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *WALLACE, HERMAN C.(Killed in Action) Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company B, 301st Engineer Combat Battalion, 76th Infantry Division Place and date: Near Prumzurley, Germany, 27 February 1945 Entered service at: Lubbock, Tex. G.O. No.: 92, 25 October 1945 Citation: He displayed conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity. While helping clear enemy mines from a road, he stepped on a well-concealed S-type antipersonnel mine. Hearing the characteristic noise indicating that the mine had been activated and, if he stepped aside, would be thrown upward to explode above ground and spray the area with fragments, surely killing 2 comrades directly behind him and endangering other members of his squad, he deliberately placed his other foot on the mine even though his best chance for survival was to fall prone. Pvt. Wallace was killed when the charge detonated, but his supreme heroism at the cost of his life confined the blast to the ground and his own body and saved his fellow soldiers from death or injury.
Major George A. Davis, Jr-Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient (IMO) marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, October 16, 2003
5. Major George A. Davis, Jr-Korean War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient (IMO) marker
He has a IN MEMORY OF cenotaph marker in Block 47 near the front office. The GPS is N33.5557 W101.8145. His remains were never found. His Medal of Honor information and citation is: *DAVIS, GEORGE ANDREW, JR.(Killed in Action) Rank and organization: Major, U.S. Air Force, CO, 334th Fighter Squadron, 4th Fighter Group, 5th Air Force. Place and date: Near Sinuiju-Yalu River area, Korea, 10 February 1952. Entered service at: Lubbock, Tex. Citation: Maj. Davis distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. While leading a flight of 4 F-86 Saberjets on a combat aerial patrol mission near the Manchurian border, Maj. Davis' element leader ran out of oxygen and was forced to retire from the flight with his wingman accompanying him. Maj. Davis and the remaining F-86's continued the mission and sighted a formation of approximately 12 enemy MIG-15 aircraft speeding southward toward an area where friendly fighter-bombers were conducting low level operations against the Communist lines of communications. With selfless disregard for the numerical superiority of the enemy, Maj. Davis positioned his 2 aircraft, then dove at the MIG formation. While speeding through the formation from the rear he singled out a MIG-15 and destroyed it with a concentrated burst of fire. Although he was now under continuous fire from the enemy fighters to his rear, Maj. Davis sustained his attack. He fired at another MIG-15 which, bursting into smoke and flames, went into a vertical dive. Rather than maintain his superior speed and evade the enemy fire being concentrated on him, he elected to reduce his speed and sought out still a third MIG-15. During this latest attack his aircraft sustained a direct hit, went out of control, then crashed into a mountain 30 miles south of the Yalu River. Maj. Davis' bold attack completely disrupted the enemy formation, permitting the friendly fighter-bombers to successfully complete their interdiction mission. Maj. Davis, by his indomitable fighting spirit, heroic aggressiveness, and superb courage in engaging the enemy against formidable odds exemplified valor at its highest.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 79 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 1, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   3, 4, 5. submitted on August 3, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.
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