Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Apollo Beach in Hillsborough County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Manatee Scar Identification

 
 
Manatee Scar Identification Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 9, 2013
1. Manatee Scar Identification Marker
Inscription. Manatee photo-identification is a research technique that uses the unique pattern of scars and mutilations on a manatee’s trunk and tail fluke to identify an individual animal over time.

In Florida, the scars are primarily a result of encounters with boats; however, entanglements in fishing gear, cold stress lesions and fungal infections also can cause scarring. Photo-identification data provide insights into manatee movements, site fidelity, habitat use, behavior, intra- and inter-specific associations, and length of calf dependency.

In addition, the capture histories produced through photo-identification efforts are used to estimate annual adult survival rates and to model population dynamics for state and federal assessments of Florida manatee status and recovery. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission works collaboratively with federal and private partners to document Florida mandates throughout their range.
Florida Thank you
Manatee View Center
Apollo Beach, Fl
TECO
Tampa, Electrics
 
Erected by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
 
Location. 27° 47.557′ N, 82° 24.074′ W. Marker is in Apollo Beach, Florida, in Hillsborough County
Manatee Scar Identification Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 9, 2013
2. Manatee Scar Identification Marker
DeSoto (TB220) Gender: Male First sighting: December 2002 - Fort de Soto County Park DeSoto was rescued December 9, 2002, from Fort de Soto County Park after FWC researchers determined that he was too young to be alone in the chilly waters of the Gulf of Mexico. After spending over a year in rehabilitation facilities, DeSoto was released with tracking gear at the TECO Big Bend Power Plant in February 2004. In March 2005 he was captured to assess his body condition and to remove his tracking gear. Since that time he has been documented returning here when temperatures in the area drop.
. Marker is on Dickman Rd. Touch for map. Marker is located inside park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6690 Dickman Rd, Apollo Beach FL 33572, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Storm Water and the Estuary (here, next to this marker); The Life Cycle of the Monarch Butterfly (here, next to this marker); What Role Do Mangroves Play In An Estuary? (here, next to this marker); Long-Legged Wading Birds Stalk the Shallows (here, next to this marker); Listen carefully to hear a manatee! (approx. 0.2 miles away); Do You See a Manatee? (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Butterfly’s Habitat (approx. ¼ mile away); De Soto Trail (approx. 5.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Apollo Beach.
 
Also see . . .
1. Using Scars to Identify the Blue Spring Manatee Adoptees. Historically, more manatees have been killed from collisions with watercraft each year than from any other identifiable cause. Further, the vast majority of living manatees have been injured by watercraft and bear scars from these collisions – many manatees have suffered such strikes multiple times. (Submitted on August 3, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

2. The Stories Told by Manatee Scars. What can we learn from their scars? In addition to enabling individual identification, we sometimes can determine when, where, and
Manatee Scar Identification Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 9, 2013
3. Manatee Scar Identification Marker
Wedge (TB021), Gender: Male, First sighting: October 1993 - Tampa Bay, Wedge was first sighted in 1993 when his scars were fresh. Since then, they have healed into a series of wedge-shaped white scars. He regularly visits the TECO Big Bend Power Plant during the winter and has also been photographed at the TECO Bayside Power Station. During the warmer months as well as on warmer winter days, Wedge often spends his time in a small basin off Old Tampa Bay.
how a manatee acquired its scars. For example, with fresh scars we can sometimes determine if it was hit by a boat, and if so, what part of the boat - propeller or hull, or type of boat. Manatees also may be scarred after exposure to very cold temperatures, and these features become evident during cold winters. (Submitted on August 3, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 
 
Categories. AnimalsEnvironment
 
Manatee Scar Identification Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 9, 2013
4. Manatee Scar Identification Marker
Splat (TB122), Gender: Male, First sighting: February 1996 - TEC Big Ben Power Plant, Since his initial sighting in 1996, Splat has been documented at this warm water site during most winter seasons. He has also been photographed in the Sarasota Bay Area during spring months. Splat acquired the large scar on his back, as well as the one on his left side, some time between the winters of 2001 and 2003. In addition, Splat was captured and fitted with a GPS tag in January 2006, and monitored as part of a telemetry study for approximately three months.
Manatee Scar Identification Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 9, 2013
5. Manatee Scar Identification Marker
Marge(TB048), Gender: Female, First sighting: February 1993 TECO Big Bend Power Plant, Marge was first documented when she was captured as part of a tracking study in February 1993. She was tracked using telemetry gear for about a year and has been documented through photo-identification at one of the Tampa bay area power plants every winter since. She acquired the large scar series on the right side of her head sometime between the summer and fall of 2001. Marge is easily recognizable with the large scar in the center of her back and her healed head scars. She has been seen with multiple calves over the years making her a valuable member of the manatee population.
Manatee Scar Identification Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, January 9, 2013
6. Manatee Scar Identification Marker
Elsie (TB077), Gender: Female, First sighting: January 1983 - Ft. Myers Power Plant, Elsie was first documented at the Ft. Myers Power Plant; however she is also a regular visitor of the TECO Big Bend Power Plant. She was first photographed here in February 1992. Since then she has spent her winter months at one of these two warm water sites. On occasion she has even been documented using both sites during the same winter. Throughout the years, Elsie has been sighted with a calf by her side several times.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 3, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 58 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 3, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement