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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anniston in Calhoun County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Southern Railway Station Attack

January 2, 1961

 

—Anniston Civil Rights Trail —

 
Southern Railway Station Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 5, 2017
1. Southern Railway Station Attack Marker
Inscription. Local "Jim Crow" laws in the first half of the 20th century enforced racial segregation in public transportation facilities throughout the South. The U.S. Supreme Court decision in Boynton v. Virginia (1960) upheld that segregation in these facilities was illegal, yet African American Talladega College student Art Bacon encountered hostility when he arrived by train at this station. As he left the station, he was beaten by five white men for sitting in the formerly "whites-only" waiting room.

Four days later, Talladega College students and faculty marched peacefully along Gurnee Avenue, at one point circling the police station, in protest of the assault.
 
Erected 2016 by City of Anniston Historic Trails Program. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Location. 33° 38.951′ N, 85° 49.927′ W. Marker is in Anniston, Alabama, in Calhoun County. Marker is on West 4th Street east of Spruce Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located in front of the Anniston Amtrak Station. Marker is at or near this postal address: 126 West 4th Street, Anniston AL 36201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Trailways Attack (approx. half a mile away); Trailways Bus Station Attack (approx. half a mile away); Anniston Public Library Desegregation (approx. 0.6 miles away); Greyhound Bus Station Protest, May 14, 1961 (approx. 0.6 miles away); Calhoun County World War I Memorial
Southern Railway Station image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 5, 2017
2. Southern Railway Station
The station was originally designed by Milo R. Hanker and built in 1925 for the Southern Railway, and was one of the last railroad-operated active passenger stations in the country.
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Tyrus Raymond Cobb (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Murder of Willie Brewster, July 15, 1965 (approx. 0.6 miles away); Grace Episcopal Church (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anniston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia article on the Boynton v. Virginia Supreme Court case. (Submitted on August 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Wikipedia article on Jim Crow Laws. (Submitted on August 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
3. Anniston Civil Rights Trail Map (.pdf). (Submitted on August 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsRailroads & Streetcars
 
The view south along the tracks and station. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 5, 2017
3. The view south along the tracks and station.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 66 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 5, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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