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Yorktown in York County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Surrender at Yorktown

Colonial National Historical Park

 
 
Surrender at Yorktown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2008
1. Surrender at Yorktown Marker
Inscription. Near this spot on the afternoon of October 19, 1781 – as silence prevailed among the Allied soldiers and onlookers – all eyes were trained on the approaching British troops. Cornwallis, sending word that he was ill, appointed his second in command, Brigadier General Charles O’Hara, to surrender his sword. O’Hara mistakenly approached French General Rochambeau to present the sword. He was quickly corrected and led to Washington, the supreme commander of the Allied forces. Washington refused to take the blade from O’Hara’s “good hand,” and referred him to Major General Benjamin Lincoln, his second in command. Lincoln, accepting it, escorted O’Hara to an open field about one and a half miles from here, where British and German soldiers, regiment after regiment, grounded their arms.
 
Erected by Colonial National Historical Park, National Park Service.
 
Location. 37° 13.574′ N, 76° 30.363′ W. Marker is in Yorktown, Virginia, in York County. Marker is on Cook Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Yorktown Battlefield in Colonial National Historical Park, at stop C on the Battlefield Tour. Marker is in this post office area: Yorktown VA 23690, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker on the Yorktown Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2008
2. Marker on the Yorktown Battlefield
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Second Allied Siege Line ( a few steps from this marker); Slabtown ( within shouting distance of this marker); Shiloh Baptist Church ( within shouting distance of this marker); Yorktown National Cemetery ( within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Shiloh Baptist Church ( about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Grand French Battery ( approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Grand French Battery ( approx. 0.2 miles away); First Allied Siege Line ( approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Yorktown.
 
More about this marker. The marker is dominated by the famous John Trumbull painting of the Surrender at Yorktown. The original painting today hangs in the capital rotunda in Washington D.C. The painting identifies the French, British and American troops, as well as Rochambeau, O’Hara, Lincoln and Washington. It has a caption of “Washington’s former aide-de-camp, Colonel John Trumbull, painted The Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1797. By then, many of the American and French officers depicted here were continuing their bond of alliance through the Society of Cincinnati, formed under the leadership of General Henry Knox in 1783.”
 
Also see . . .
Second Allied Siege Lines image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2008
3. Second Allied Siege Lines
The marker is located near the Second Allied Siege Lines.

1. Yorktown Battlefield. National Park Service. (Submitted on August 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Yorktown. The Patriot Resource website. (Submitted on August 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Battle of Yorktown 1781. A British perspective of the Battle of Yorktown from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on August 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Surrender Field image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2008
4. Surrender Field
General Lincoln led General O’Hara and the British and German soldiers to this field where they laid down the arms and colors.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,442 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 23, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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