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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anniston in Calhoun County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Human Relations Council

 

—Anniston Civil Rights Trail —

 
The Human Relations Council Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 5, 2017
1. The Human Relations Council Marker
Inscription. The Anniston City Commission, on May 16, 1963, established by resolution the Human Relations Council, consisting of five white men and four black men. The Council's purpose was to "make recommendations concerning human relations," and its members were to be "without outside influence." United States President John F. Kennedy (1961-1963) praised the council's formation as on that should "serve as a model" for other American cities.

Council Members:
Rev. J. Phillips Noble, Chair
Raleigh Byrd, Harold Edward Cosper, Wilfred Galbraith,
Marcus A. Howze, Rev. William B. McClain, Grant Oden,
Rev. Nimrod Q. Reynolds, Leonard Roberts

 
Erected 2016 by City of Anniston Historic Trails Program. (Marker Number 5.)
 
Location. 33° 39.559′ N, 85° 49.889′ W. Marker is in Anniston, Alabama, in Calhoun County. Marker is on Gurnee Avenue south of 12th Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at Anniston City Hall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1128 Gurnee Avenue, Anniston AL 36201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Murder of Willie Brewster, July 15, 1965 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Greyhound Bus Station Protest, May 14, 1961
The Human Relations Council Marker in front of City Hall. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 5, 2017
2. The Human Relations Council Marker in front of City Hall.
(about 500 feet away); Trailways Bus Station Attack (approx. ¼ mile away); Trailways Attack (approx. ¼ mile away); Anniston Public Library Desegregation (approx. ¼ mile away); Anniston World War (approx. 0.3 miles away); Parker Memorial Baptist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Tyrus Raymond Cobb (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anniston.
 
Regarding The Human Relations Council. When Council members attempted to integrate the "whites-only" public library on Sunday afternoon, September 15, 1963 (the same day as the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham), violence ensued and two council members, Rev. Nimrod Reynolds and Rev. William McClain, were severely beaten by a mob.
 
Also see . . .  Anniston Civil Rights Trail Map (.pdf). (Submitted on August 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 55 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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