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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anniston in Calhoun County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Anniston Public Library Desegregation

September 15-16, 1963

 

—Anniston Civil Rights Trail —

 
Anniston Public Library Desegregation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 5, 2017
1. Anniston Public Library Desegregation Marker
Inscription. Desegregation of the Library began when two African American pastors, Reverends William B. McClain and Nimrod Q. Reynolds, peacefully attempted to enter the building on September 15, 1963. Their actions were endorsed by the city of Anniston Human Relations Council, which was pursuing desegregation of public institutions in Anniston. As the men approached the Library, several white men attacked them, and both men were injured, Reynolds seriously. The next day, Reverends J. Phillips Noble and George Smitherman, City Commissioner Miller Sproull, and Library board members Charlie Doster and Carelton Lentz accompanied McClain as he entered the Library without incident and checked out a book.
 
Erected 2016 by City of Anniston Historic Trails Program. (Marker Number 6.)
 
Location. 33° 39.419′ N, 85° 49.666′ W. Marker is in Anniston, Alabama, in Calhoun County. Marker is at the intersection of East 10th Street and Wilmer Avenue, on the right when traveling east on East 10th Street. Touch for map. Located at the very east side of the library. Marker is at or near this postal address: 108 East 10th Street, Anniston AL 36201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tyrus Raymond Cobb (within
The Public Library of Anniston-Calhoun County (marker to the left). image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 5, 2017
2. The Public Library of Anniston-Calhoun County (marker to the left).
shouting distance of this marker); Calhoun County World War I Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Grace Episcopal Church (about 600 feet away); Trailways Attack (about 700 feet away); Trailways Bus Station Attack (about 700 feet away); Greyhound Bus Station Protest, May 14, 1961 (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Murder of Willie Brewster, July 15, 1965 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Parker Memorial Baptist Church (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anniston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Integration and the Anniston Public Library, Anniston, Alabama (blog). The original Anniston Public Library was built in 1918 with a grant of $20,000 from Andrew Carnegie. Like many libraries during the pre-Civil Rights Era, the Anniston Public Library was segregated. The current library, in the same location, was built in 1966. (Submitted on August 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.) 

2. Anniston Civil Rights Trail Map (.pdf). (Submitted on August 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansArts, Letters, MusicCivil Rights
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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