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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
East Meadow in Nassau County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Francis Cardinal Spellman

 
 
Cardinal Francis Spellman Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 25, 2017
1. Cardinal Francis Spellman Marker
Inscription.
Dedicated to
Francis Cardinal Spellman
for his life of service to God and country
and to men of every race, creed, and color
in times of peace and war, and especially
for his personal visitations to America's
fighting men throughout the world.

 
Erected 1972 by Nassau County American Legion and Auxiliary.
 
Location. 40° 44.028′ N, 73° 34.667′ W. Marker is in East Meadow, New York, in Nassau County. Marker can be reached from Park Boulevard north of County Route 24. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: East Meadow NY 11554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. American Legion Auxiliary (here, next to this marker); The Four Immortal Chaplains (here, next to this marker); 77th Infantry Division Reserve Veterans Memorial (here, next to this marker); Battle of the Bulge Veterans Memorial (here, next to this marker); 82nd Airborne Division (a few steps from this marker); Catholic War Veterans Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Still on Patrol (a few steps from this marker); War Dogs Memorial (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in East Meadow.
 
Also see . . .
Francis Cardinal Spellman Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 25, 2017
2. Francis Cardinal Spellman Marker - Wide View
The Four Chaplains marker is on the left, the Francis Cardinal Spellman marker is in the middle, and the American Legion Auxiliary marker is on the right.
 Francis Spellman (Wikipedia). "Spellman was an outspoken supporter of the Vietnam War, to the extent that the conflict became known as "Spelly's War" and the Cardinal as the "Bob Hope of the clergy". He met Ngo Dinh Diem in 1950 and, favorably impressed by his strongly Catholic and anti-Communist views, promoted his career; however, he disassociated from Diem before the latter's assassination in 1963. Fearful of Communist gains in Vietnam, Spellman had urged American intervention since late 1954, but by the 1960s his views were strongly criticized by antiwar activists and even his fellow religious leaders....When Pope Paul VI visited the United States in October 1965, he indirectly rebuked Spellman's hawkish stance by pleading for peace before the United Nations. A group of college students protested outside his residence in December 1965 for suppressing antiwar priests, and he later spent that year's Christmas with troops in South Vietnam. While in Vietnam, Spellman quoted Stephen Decatur in declaring, "My country, may it always be right, but right or wrong, my country". He also described Vietnam as a "war for civilization" and "Christ's war against the Vietcong and the people of North Vietnam". One priest accused Spellman of "[blessing] the guns which the pope is begging us to put down". In January
<i>Archibishop Spellman of New York visits with Colonel Thomas C. Darcy...in Tunisia</i> image. Click for full size.
Office of War Information, courtesy of the Library of Congress, circa 1943
3. Archibishop Spellman of New York visits with Colonel Thomas C. Darcy...in Tunisia
Full title: Archibishop Spellman of New York visits with Colonel Thomas C. Darcy at an advanced American Air Force fighter base in Tunisia. Colonel Darcy is commander of a fighter group and at one time lived in Monsignor Spellman's parish in Roxbury, Massachusetts
1967, antiwar protestors disrupted a Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral. His support for Vietnam, along with his opposition to church reform, greatly undermined Spellman's clout within the church and country." (Submitted on August 7, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.War, VietnamWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 7, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 52 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 7, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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