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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
East Meadow in Nassau County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The “Comfort Women”

 
 
The "Comfort Women" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 25, 2017
1. The "Comfort Women" Marker
Inscription. In remembrance of the more than 200,000 women and girls who were abducted for the use of sexual slavery by the armed forces of the Government of Imperial Japan, 1930's-1945. Known to the world as "comfort women", they suffered heinous crimes against humanity that must not go unrecognized. The grave violations of human dignity that they endured will not be forgotten.

Dedicated June 20, 2012
Nassau County
Edward P. Mangana, County Executive
Korean American Public Affairs Committee
Gwangju Metropolitan City, Republic of Korea

 
Erected 2012 by Nassau County, Korean American Public Affairs Committee, Gwangju Metropolitan City, Republic of Korea.
 
Location. 40° 44.012′ N, 73° 34.614′ W. Marker is in East Meadow, New York, in Nassau County. Marker can be reached from Park Boulevard north of County Route 24. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: East Meadow NY 11554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Polish Freedom Fighters Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); African-American Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); The Silent Service
The "Comfort Women" Memorial - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 25, 2017
2. The "Comfort Women" Memorial - Wide View
The marker is flanked by New York State Senate Legislative Resolution 304 (2013) on the left and by New York State Assembly Legislative Resolution 415 (2013) on the right. The Assembly resolution commends the Korean American Community for erecting the Memorial, while the Senate resolution "memorializes" the Memorial. Neither resolution has the force of law.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of the Bulge Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Jewish War Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Still on Patrol (within shouting distance of this marker); Medals of Honor Recipients Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Catholic War Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in East Meadow.
 
Also see . . .  Comfort Women (Wikipedia). "Comfort women were women and girls forced into sexual slavery by the Imperial Japanese Army in occupied territories before and during World War II....The name "comfort women" is a translation of the Japanese ianfu (慰安婦), a euphemism for "prostitute(s)". Estimates vary as to how many women were involved, with numbers ranging from as low as 20,000 (by Japanese historian Ikuhiko Hata) to as high as 360,000 to 410,000 (by a Chinese scholar); the exact numbers are still being researched and debated. Most of the women were from occupied countries, including Korea, China,
The "Comfort Women" - Closeup of Photograph on Monument image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 25, 2017
3. The "Comfort Women" - Closeup of Photograph on Monument
and the Philippines. Women were used for military "comfort stations" from Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan (then a Japanese dependency), Indonesia (then the Dutch East Indies), East Timor (then Portuguese Timor),and other Japanese-occupied territories. Stations were located in Japan, China, the Philippines, Indonesia, then Malaya, Thailand, Burma, New Guinea, Hong Kong, Macau, and French Indochina. A smaller number of women of European origin were also involved from the Netherlands and Australia....According to testimonies, young women were abducted from their homes in countries under Imperial Japanese rule. In many cases, women were also lured with promises of work in factories or restaurants; once recruited, they were incarcerated in comfort stations both inside their nations and abroad." (Submitted on August 8, 2017.) 
 
Categories. War, World IIWars, Non-USWomen
 
New York State Senate Legislative Resolution 304 (2013) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 25, 2017
4. New York State Senate Legislative Resolution 304 (2013)
New York State Assembly Legislative Resolution 415 (2013) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 25, 2017
5. New York State Assembly Legislative Resolution 415 (2013)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 8, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 8, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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