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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Amityville in Suffolk County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Suffolk County

 
 
Suffolk County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, February 20, 2017
1. Suffolk County Marker
Inscription.
Organized Nov. 1, 1683
One of the original
counties of the Province
of New York. Originally
East Riding of Yorkshire

 
Erected 1975 by Suffolk County A.R.B.C.
 
Location. 40° 40.719′ N, 73° 24.781′ W. Marker is in Amityville, New York, in Suffolk County. Marker is on Oak Street west of Lake Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Amityville NY 11701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Four Chaplains Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away); American Warrior (Copiague World War I Memorial) (approx. 0.7 miles away); Copiague World War I Immigrant Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away); Babylon Railroad Co. Trolley Route (approx. mile away); Great Neck Road School (approx. mile away); Frank Buck's Zoo (approx. 1.2 miles away); Thorn Estate (approx. 1.6 miles away); Woodcastle Hotel (approx. 1.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on Oak Street, on the southern edge of Peterkin Park.
 
Also see . . .  Province of New York (Wikipedia). "A colonial Assembly
Suffolk County Marker - Wide View, Looking East on Oak Street image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, February 20, 2017
2. Suffolk County Marker - Wide View, Looking East on Oak Street
was created in October 1683. New York was the last of the English colonies to have an assembly. The assembly passed the Province of New York constitution on October 30, the first of its kind in the colonies. This constitution gave New Yorkers more rights than any other group of colonists including the protection from taxation without representation. On November 1, 1683, the government was reorganized, and the state was divided into twelve counties, each of which was subdivided into towns. Ten of those counties still exist (see above), but two (Cornwall and Dukes) were in territory purchased by the Duke of York from the Earl of Stirling, and are no longer within the territory of the State of New York, having been transferred by treaty to Massachusetts. While the number of counties has been increased to 62, the pattern still remains that a town in New York State is a subdivision of a county, similar to New England." (Submitted on August 8, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 8, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 108 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 8, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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