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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hager Mill

Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area

 
 
Hager Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
1. Hager Mill Marker
Inscription. Hager Mill was constructed in 1790 by Daniel Stull and Colonel Nathaniel Rochester and the nearby miller's house has a date stone inscribed 1791. Prior to the Civil War, it was owned by the Hager Family. During the war, Andrew Hager operated this mill and a store on Public Square. Hager was a slave owner loyal to the Union. In 1864, his mill was raided by Confederate soldiers who provided receipts for all supplies taken, which he entered into his ledger “to be paid when the devil dies” knowing full well he would never receive payment from the Confederate government.

The City purchased the mill in 1917 and unsuccessfully attempted to run it. The mill was sold to John A. Forsythe in 1928, but 5 acres were retained by the City for a public park.

Fascinating Fact

After the Battle of Hagerstown on July 6, 1861, exhausted troopers from Company D, 11th Virginia Cavalry approached a mill on the southeast edge of Hagerstown (believed to be this mill). They found a teenage girl in the doorway wearing an apron in the configuration of a Confederate flag. The girl and her apron were robustly cheered by the men, looking for any sign of hospitality after their campaign in Pennsylvania. Captain Edward McDonald asked the teenager for a piece of the apron, to which she responded that he could have all
Hager Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
2. Hager Mill Marker
of it. She presented the apron to the Captain and Private Henry. Madison Watkins moved forward and asked to carry it as a flag. The captain agreed and the apron was tied to a staff Private Watkins carried it for the rest of the day until he wounded by artillery fire near Jones Crossroads, south of the city. Found on the field, he had hidden the apron in his uniform to prevent its capture: Watkins was taken back to Hagerstown where his leg was amputated, but he soon died and was buried in the almshouse graveyard. The “young color bearer” likely lies in an unknown grave in Washington Confederate Cemetery. In the post-war years, Captain McDonald displayed “the apron flag” at Confederate veterans' bazaars, and a popular poem about it gained some notoriety. Around that time, Col. Henry Kyd Douglas, a local Confederate Veteran, attempted to track down the young girl who donated the apron, but her identity was never discovered.
 
Location. 39° 38.002′ N, 77° 42.957′ W. Marker is in Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on Mill Street east of Frederick Street (Alternate U.S. 40), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 288 Mill Street, Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this
Hager Mill image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Hager Mill
Hager Mill, showing the mill race and water wheel (since removed and replaced with a garage addition).
marker. Willow Lane Park (approx. 0.4 miles away); Rose Hill Cemetery (approx. 0.4 miles away); Jonathan Hager (approx. 0.4 miles away); William Thomas Hamilton (approx. 0.4 miles away); Jesse Duncan Elliott (approx. 0.4 miles away); Ammon H. Kreider & Lewis E. Reisner (approx. 0.4 miles away); Maurice Edward Frock (approx. 0.4 miles away); Edward Mayberry Mobley (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hagerstown.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
Hagers Mill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
4. Hagers Mill
Hagers Mill, as it appeared in Harpers Weekly newspaper on October 18, 1862 with Confederate wagons poised in front of it, waiting to receive commandeered supplies.
Close-up of photo, courtesy of Tim Snyder, on marker
The Apron Flag image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
5. The Apron Flag
What is believed to be a replica of “the apron flag” is displayed in the Davis History House Museum in Romney, West Virginia.
Close-up of Maryland Cracker Barrel Magazine photo on marker
Hager Mill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
6. Hager Mill
Tie-Rod End image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
7. Tie-Rod End
Hager's Mill
The Miller's House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
8. The Miller's House
<br><br>S<br>D & M<br>1791 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2017
9.

S
D & M
1791
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 17, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 10, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 116 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 10, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on August 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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