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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stockholm in Stockholm County, Södermanland Province, Sweden — Northern Europe (Scandinavia)
 

Konserthuset / The Concert Hall

 
 
Konserthuset / The Concert Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 11, 2017
1. Konserthuset / The Concert Hall Marker
Inscription. Konserthuset

Uppfördes 1924-26 efter ritningar av Ivar Tengbom och räknas som en höjdpunkt i den svenska 20-talsklassicismen. Flera av 1920-talets främsta konstnärer, bland dem Isaac Grünewald, har bidragit till interiörens utformning. Vid trappan mot Hötorget restes Carl Milles' Orfeusgrupp 1936.

I Konserthuset sker den årliga utdelningen av Nobelprisen.


The Concert Hall

Built 1924-1926. Architect, Ivar Tengbom. The interior contains the work of prominent artists of the period, such as Isaac Grünewald. Carl Milles' "Orfeus" was erected by the steps in 1936. The Nobel Prize presentation ceremony is held here.
 
Erected by Samfundet S:t Erik.
 
Location. 59° 20.123′ N, 18° 3.802′ E. Marker is in Stockholm, Södermanland Province, in Stockholm County. Marker is at the intersection of Kungsgatan and Sveavägen, on the right when traveling east on Kungsgatan. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Kungsgatan 38, Stockholm, Södermanland Province 103 87, Sweden.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Centrumhuset / Center Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Warodellska Huset / The Warodell House
Konserthuset / The Concert Hall Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 11, 2017
2. Konserthuset / The Concert Hall Marker - Wide View
(about 180 meters away, measured in a direct line); August Blanche (about 180 meters away); A Park and Gardens (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Första Cirkusföreställningen i Sverige / The First Circus in Sweden (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Svenska Fotbollförbundet / Swedish Football Association (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Carl Jonas Love Almquist (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Centralposthuset / The Central Post Office (approx. 0.4 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stockholm.
 
Also see . . .  A temple in honour of music (konserthuset.se). Konserthuset Stockholm is one of Sweden’s foremost architectural masterpieces. Opened in 1926, it was conceived by the architect Ivar Tengbom during a productive period in the history of Stockholm. Konserthuset Stockholm was built in order to provide a base for the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra and host the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony, among other events. (Submitted on August 11, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicEntertainment
 
Carl Milles' Orfeus - Found on the West Side of the Konserthuset image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 11, 2017
3. Carl Milles' Orfeus - Found on the West Side of the Konserthuset
Konserthuset / The Concert Hall - The West Side, After a Flea Market image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, June 11, 2017
4. Konserthuset / The Concert Hall - The West Side, After a Flea Market
<i>Stockholm. Konserthuset.</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard published by Axel Eliasson, Stockholm, circa 1928
5. Stockholm. Konserthuset.
A site was chosen at Hötorget’s market stalls among the run-down, drab, low-rise buildings in the area, and a classical Greek temple would emerge in the honour of music, according to Tengbom’s firm vision. Konserthuset was constructed between 1923 and 1926. The building is one of Stockholm’s foremost examples of neoclassicism, an era when the spirit of democracy was strong, and drew stylistic inspiration from the cradle of democracy itself – Athens. - Konserthuset.se
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 11, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 11, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 11, 2017, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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