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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Douglass and McGar Parks

 
 
Douglass and McGar Parks Texas Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, July 22, 2017
1. Douglass and McGar Parks Texas Historical Marker
Inscription. From the late 1800's, through the 1920's, during a time of Jim Crow segregation, Douglass and McGar Parks served as recreational grounds for African Americans in Fort Worth. In 1895 Thomas Mason, an African-American entrepreneur, with J.D. Johnson and A. Sumlin, purchased land in the Trinity River Bottoms. The property soon became known as Douglass Park (about 300 yards south), named for abolitionist Frederick Douglass. That same year, the park hosted a Juneteenth Celebration; this became an annual event that thousands attended. The city commissioned a special officer to patrol Douglass Park. Many noted black churches used the property, as did the Prince Hall Masons, who built a lodge on it. In 1918, Fort Worth's Park Board purchased Douglass Park; despite an attempt to revitalize the park, it fell into disrepair and in 1925, the Texas Electric Service Company purchased the property and oficially closed it.

Douglass Park led directly to the creation of another African-American park. Crowds who gathered at Douglass Park to watch Negro baseball teams play became so large that the games moved to the Texas & Pacific Ballpark, which sat on a railroad right of way across) North Main Street. The ballpark was upgraded between 1907 and 1909 and changed names to McGar Park (McGar's Field), after businessman Hiram McGar. Both black and
Douglass and McGar Parks Marker at LaGrave Field image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, July 22, 2017
2. Douglass and McGar Parks Marker at LaGrave Field
white fans came to watch McGar's Wonders (later the Black Panthers) play. Industrial development, the 1922 flood and other factors led up to the demise of the Park during the 1920's. Today, no remnant remains of the Parks, though they continue to be remembered as vital community institutions for Fort Worth African American Americans in the early 20th Century.
Marker is Property of the State of Texas

 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15744.)
 
Location. 32° 46.156′ N, 97° 20.291′ W. Marker is in Fort Worth, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker is at the intersection of Calhoun Street and NE 7th Street, on the right when traveling north on Calhoun Street. Touch for map. This marker stands next to the flagpole, outside of the stadium at La Grave Field, now closed. One cannot access the marker directly. It must been seen from outside of the fence. Marker is at or near this postal address: 301 NE 6th Street, Fort Worth TX 76164, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Founding Fort Worth (approx. mile away); First School (approx. 0.8 miles away); Tarrant County Criminal Courts Building (approx. 0.8 miles away); Site of the First Masonic Hall in Fort Worth (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Site of Camp Worth (approx. 0.8 miles away); Fort Worth (approx. 0.8 miles away); Leonard Brothers Department Store (approx. 0.9 miles away); 1784 Tarrant County 1815 (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Worth.
 
Categories. African AmericansSports
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 14, 2017, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. This page has been viewed 76 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 14, 2017, by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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