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Near Chancellorsville in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chancellorsville

 

—The Battle of Chancellorsville —

 
Chancellorsville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2008
1. Chancellorsville Marker
This marker replaces a gray and black "Chancellorsville Campaign" marker and two map boards which stood at the Visitor Center until 2008.
Inscription. The Civil War had entered its third year, and the Army of the Potomac was again on the march. Led by its new commander, "Fighting Joe" Hooker, the 134,000-man Union juggernaut crossed the Rappahannock River beyond Lee's left flank on April 28, 1863, and descended upon a former country inn known as Chancellorsville. Although reduced to just 60,000 men, Lee responded with his accustomed audacity, attacking Hooker here in the gloomy thickets of the Wilderness.

Four days of pitched battle followed, in which Lee outmaneuvered and outfought his opponent, ultimately forcing him to retreat. It was the Southern leader's greatest triumph of the war, but it came at great cost. On May 10, 1863, his top general, Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, died of wounds received in the battle. Without Jackson to carry out his plans, Lee never again achieved such stunning success.
 
Erected 2008 by Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park - National Park Service - Dept. of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 18.687′ N, 77° 38.954′ W. Marker is near Chancellorsville, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker can be reached from Plank Road / Germania Highway (State Highway 3), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map.
Park Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2008
2. Park Map
Located in front of the entrance to the Chancellorsville Visitors Center to the Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 9001 Plank Road, Fredericksburg VA 22407, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chancellorsville Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); A Fatal Reconnaissance (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Catastrophe (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Chancellorsville Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Memorializing Jackson's Death (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Chancellorsville Campaign (about 300 feet away); Jackson Monuments (about 300 feet away); Jackson (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chancellorsville.
 
More about this marker. In the upper part of the marker is a painting of The Battle of Chancellorsville. To the right of the text are portraits of the Generals mentioned in the text - Jackson, Lee, and Hooker. Jackson's portrait was taken just a week before Chancellorsville, his last and greatest battle. Lee's portrait is captioned, by 1863, much of the Confederacy saw Lee as
Chancellorsville Marker and Park Orientation Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2008
3. Chancellorsville Marker and Park Orientation Kiosk
the best, and perhaps only, hope for Confederate victory.
Hooker's portrait notes that Chancellorsville was Hooker's only battle as a commander of an army.

The lower part of the marker is a painting depicting the Chancellor Inn and surrounding area. Chancellorsville was not a village but a tavern at a strategic crossroads. Frances Chancellor and her six children stayed in the house until May 3, when, at the height of the battle, flames engulfed the house and drove the Chancellors away.

A small inset map shows the tour stops on the battlefield, Jackson fell wounded near where the modern visitor center now stands. Follow the driving tour to reach the remainder of Chancellorsville Battlefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Chancellorsville. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on August 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Old Chancellorville Campaign Marker. This marker replaced a 1950’s era marker that stood here until early 2008. Click on this link to see the old marker. (Submitted on August 25, 2008.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Fredericksburg and Spostylvania National Military Park image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 24, 2008
4. Fredericksburg and Spostylvania National Military Park
This standard kiosk stands next to the Chancellorsville marker. It reads:
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, and Spotsylvania - this is the bloodiest landscape in North America. No place more vividly reflects the Civil War's tragic cost in all its forms. A city bombarded, bloodied, and looted. Farms large and small ruined. Refugees by the thousands forced into the countryside. More than 85,000 men wounded; 15,000 killed - most now in graves unknown.

The fading scars of battle, the home places of bygone families, and the granite tributes to those who fought still mark these lands. These places reveal the trials of a community and nation at war - a virtuous tragedy that freed four million Americans and reunited a nation. To visit the battlefields, begin your tour at either the Fredericksburg Battlefield Visitor Center or the Chancellorsville Battlefield Visitor Center.
Chancellorsville Painting / Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
5. Chancellorsville Painting / Map
Near the visitor Center is this map with the following numbered points indicating the key points of the battle:

1 - Jackson and Lee met here May 1.
2 - Jackson's flank maneuver early morning May 2.
3 - Hooker convinced that Jackson was in retreat, met with some success here.
4 - Lee's position May 2 thwarts Union left flank.
5 - Federal troops resting unaware of Jackson's imminent attack and stampeded.
6 - Jackson halts here to make a reconnaissance.
7 - Jackson reconnoiters (Burton Farm).
8 - 6 p.m. Jackson drives forward, stampeding the Eleventh Corps. His wide line overlapping the Union's desperate attempts to reform.
9 - 7 p.m. Here remnants of the Eleventh Corps make a last stand.
10 - Eleventh Corps Retreating.
11 - Jackson mortally wounded here.
12 - Hazel Grove. Confederate guns batter the Federals May 3.
13 - Federal troops retreating May 3.
14 - Hooker's last defensive line May 3,4,5.
Compass at the Chancellorsville Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 18, 2008
6. Compass at the Chancellorsville Visitor Center
As at many locations on the Fredericksburg - Spotsylvania Battlefields, a compass points out the distance and direction to related locations. Working from the north, clockwise: Gettysburg - 115 miles, U.S. Ford - 3.8 miles, Apex Hooker's Last Line - 0.9 miles, Bank's Ford - 6.7 miles, Chancellorsville - 0.9 miles, Fairview - 0.5 miles, Lee-Jackson Bivouac - 1.8 miles, Guinea Station - 18 miles, Richmond - 55 miles, Catharine Furnace - 1.5 miles, Hazel Grove - 0.8 miles, Gordonsville - 32 miles, Federal Right - 2 miles, Germanna Ford - 8 miles, and Ely's Ford - 3.8 miles.
Chancellorsville Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, July 18, 2008
7. Chancellorsville Visitor Center
These marker is located in close proximity to the visitor center. Compass can be seen in the foreground.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,481 times since then and 87 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week August 24, 2008. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 24, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on October 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7. submitted on July 25, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.
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