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Near Taylors in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

William Few Bridge

 
 
William Few Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, August 24, 2008
1. William Few Bridge Marker
Inscription.
Named in 1984 in honor
of
pioneer settler of Upper
Greenville County
who entered this state
from Georgia in 1787
and whose descendants
have lived on these lands
ever since.

Mr. Few is said to have
built the first bridge
and a later covered
bridge at this location
on South Tyger River.

At least since 1882,
the bridges here or near
here have been called
Few's Bridge.

 
Location. 35° 1.663′ N, 82° 18.918′ W. Marker is near Taylors, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is on Fews Bridge Road (State Highway 113), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is next to the southwest end of the bridge as you cross over where the South Tyger forms Lake Robinson. Marker is in this post office area: Greer SC 29651, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Mountain View School (approx. 2.3 miles away); O'Neal Village (approx. 2.6 miles away); Manufacturing Site (was approx. 2.7 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Mush Creek Baptist Church (approx. 4.1 miles away); To the Glory of God
William Few Bridge and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, August 24, 2008
2. William Few Bridge and Marker
(approx. 4.1 miles away); Tigerville (approx. 4.1 miles away); North Greenville Baptist Academy (approx. 4.3 miles away); Gilreath's Mill (approx. 4.3 miles away); William Preston Few (1867-1940) (approx. 4.4 miles away); Campbell’s Covered Bridge (approx. 5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Taylors.
 
Also see . . .
1. William Preston Few 1867-1940, First President of Duke University. William Preston Few, was continuously associated with Duke University and Trinity College for forty-four years first as Professor of English beginning in 1896, as Dean from 1902–1910, as President of Trinity College 1910-1924 and as President of Duke University 1924-1940. (Submitted on December 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Account of the Few Family Reunion of 1909 by Rev. J.R. Walker. At Few's Chapel, in, Greenville County, S.C., there was held on August 4 a reunion of the descendants of William Few, who more than a century ago came from Georgia to this county. (Submitted on December 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Dr. Benjamin Franklin Few
Among the very early settlers of upper Greenville County (S.C.) was the Few family, which was founded in South Carolina by William Few, who came from Georgia. This William Few had a son, William Few, who was married to Sarah Ferguson,
William Few Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 23, 2010
3. William Few Bridge Marker
and among their children was Dr.. Benjamin Franklin Few, who was born on a plantation about eight miles above Greenville County on May 11, 1830.

Dr. Few secured his early education in the schools of his home community and later became a student at the Charleston Medical College, from which he graduated with the degree of M.D. Upon leaving college he took up the practice of his profession at Marietta where he remained till the outbreak of the War Between the States. Immediately upon the commencement of hostilities he volunteered as a surgeon in the Confederate army where he remained, rendering valiant service till the close of the war. Back at home he located in the Sandy Flat Community and there practiced his profession till 1882, when he moved to Greer where he remained until his death on January 22, 1923, at the age of 93. At Greer he was for many years the leading physician, but several years before his death he retired on account of his advanced age.

Dr. Few was married to Rachel Kendrick in 1863, who passed away November 7, 1922, only two months before her husband. They were the parents of five children: Rev. Robert A. Few, a member of the South Carolina Conference, who died in 1897; Dr. William P. Few, now President of Duke University of Durham, N.C.; Sallie Few, who was married to M.L. Merchant, and who died in 1889; Ignatious P. Few, who resides at Greer;
William Few Bridge and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 23, 2010
4. William Few Bridge and Marker
and Miss Ellie Few, who also lives in Greer.

All his life Dr. Few interested himself in good works, and especially those causes pertaining to the betterment of the public health, the church and the schools. He was keenly interested in all phases of education, and sent his own children to college at a time when college educations were uncommon. He was an active church worker, and had much to do with founding the First Methodist Church at Greer. He served the church in every layman's capacity, and was ever a staunch supporter of Methodism. Both a son and grandson entered the ministry of the Methodist Church.

William Few, the father of Dr. Few, was a soldier of the War of 1812, while James Few, great-grandfather of Dr. Few, was one of the first to lay down his life for the cause of liberty in the American Revolution. James Few was a son of Colonel William Few, who with his sons, rendered public service of a high order in the colonial period, during and, after the Revolution. The founder of the family in America was Richard Few, who came over with William Penn. One of the descendants of Richard Few was a member of the Continental Congress from the State of Georgia and a signer of the Constitution of the United States.

Richard Few, the first of the family in America, married Miss Mary Wheeler. He was a Quaker, while his wife was a member of the Roman Catholic
View of Lake Robinson off the Fews Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, August 24, 2008
5. View of Lake Robinson off the Fews Bridge
Church. The descendants of this couple were practically all Quakers until the coming of John Wesley, when the Few families joined the Methodist movement and rendered valient service in that cause, even down to the present day.

Dr. Benjamin Franklin Few, like his great pioneer ancestors, was a true servant of his church and state; and he was always to be found alligned squarely behind the great moral and social causes of mankind. His community, his country and his state are richer that he lived. (Source: History of Greenville County, South Carolina by James M. Richardson (1930).)
    — Submitted December 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Miss Rosa Few
L.C. Zimmerman married Miss Rosa Few, who was born at the Few plantation in the upper part of Greenville County. This is a distinguished old family of Colonial and Revolutionary antecedents. Her great-grandfather, James Few, is recognized in history as "the first martyr of the Revolution." having been murdered by the tories in Gaston County, North Carolina, at the beginning of the war in the South. He was a brother of Col. William Few of Augusta, Georgia, who was one of the two delegates from that state to the convention which framed the Constitution of the United States. The family removed from
Lake Robinson off the Fews Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, August 24, 2008
6. Lake Robinson off the Fews Bridge
Augusta to Greenville, South Carolina, soon after the Revolution. Rosa Few was a daughter of the late Benjamin Few and granddaughter of William Few of Greenville County. (Source: History of South Carolina, Vol. 4 by Harry Gardner Cutler (1906), pg 140.)
    — Submitted December 5, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 24, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,504 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 24, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on December 6, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on August 24, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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