Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

United States Colored Troops

 
 
United States Colored Troops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2017
1. United States Colored Troops Marker
Inscription. The Robert Moxley Band was a group of African-American musicians, mostly local slaves, who formed a military-style brass band in the years before the Civil War. The band held regular concerts in what is now Jacob Wheaton Park. In 1863 the U.S. Government began recruiting African-Americans into the army in segregated units. (During this period, the navy accepted black recruits who served in integrated crews with white sailors and Marines). After hearing the band play in Hagerstown, an army official was so impressed with the group that he arranged to enlist the band as a unit to serve together. During its service, the band was named the “Number One Brigade Band, United States Colored Troops”. The band made appearances at recruiting events, mostly in black communities as an instrument to inspire African-Americans to enlist. After service in the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia in 1864, the band was transferred to the west and was mustered out of service at Brownsville Texas in April, 1866. Many Hagerstown and Washington County African-Americans served in the Union army and navy during the War.

Fascinating Fact

African-Americans held a special pride in their service during the war that ended slavery. The Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.) was an organization of Union Civil War veterans, much like the
United States Colored Troops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2017
2. United States Colored Troops Marker
V.F.W. or American Legion of today. It was generally a segregated organization. Hagerstown had two G.A.R. Posts: Reno Post #4 (a white post), and Lyon Post #31, which served as a home for black G.A.R. members. Lyon Post met on the first and third Thursdays of the month. Few records survive, however it is clear through newspaper reports and surviving event programs that Lyon Post participated in many of the civic events of the day regardless of the institutionalized discrimination its individual members experienced in their daily lives.
 
Location. 39° 39.023′ N, 77° 43.103′ W. Marker is in Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Charles Street and Sumans Avenue, on the left when traveling west on Charles Street. Touch for map. Located in Wheaton Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 124 Charles Street, Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Corporal William Othello Wilson (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hagerstonians in the Civil War (approx. mile away); This Bronze Cannon (approx. mile away); Bloom Park (approx. mile away); In Memory Of (approx.
United States Colored Troops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2017
3. United States Colored Troops Marker
mile away); The Harmon Hotel (approx. 0.3 miles away); Washington County Jail (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Washington County Jail (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hagerstown.
 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
Regimental Band image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Regimental Band
The regimental band of the 107th United States Colored Troops appears much like the Number One Brigade (“Moxley's”) Band would have during the Civil War. There are no known surviving photographs of Moxley's Band in its army uniforms.
Henry Roberts image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2017
5. Henry Roberts
Henry Roberts (shown here wearing his G.A.R. membership badges) was born into slavery in Hagerstown around 1810. Securing his freedom, he moved to Oswego County, New York. In 1863, he enlisted in the 29th Connecticut Infantry Regiment (colored) and attained the rank of corporal. Since there were too few African-American veterans in the area to form a separate post, Roberts was accepted into Barney Post of the G.A.R. at Sandy Creek, New York; a mostly white post. He would serve as color bearer of Barney Post for several years.
Close-up of photo on marker
The 29th Connecticut Infantry Regiment during the Civil War image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 22, 2017
6. The 29th Connecticut Infantry Regiment during the Civil War
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 70 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 23, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement