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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Providence in Providence County, Rhode Island — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Wellspring of Providence

 
 
The Wellspring of Providence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 18, 2017
1. The Wellspring of Providence Marker
Inscription.
A freshwater spring attracted Roger Williams to this site and anchored the community. Williams built his house across the street, and religious and civil meetings took place around its “gushing” waters. The spring remained in community ownership until 1721. When the land around the spring was sold, the deed stipulated that “liberty is reserved for the inhabitants to fetch water at said spring forever.” As the city grew, however, the spring was eventually hidden under buildings. Finally, in the 1930ís, the spring was uncovered and became the centerpiece of Roger Williams Spring Park.

The spring gushed forth from the hill-side in a copious stream, issuing from a shallow pool, and from boiling quicksands, and flowed down to the adjacent river.
Author unknown
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior.
 
Location. 41° 49.836′ N, 71° 24.635′ W. Marker is in Providence, Rhode Island, in Providence County. Marker can be reached from North Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located near the subject spring, at the center of Roger Williams National Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Providence RI 02903, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
The Wellspring of Providence Marker (<b><i>wide view</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 18, 2017
2. The Wellspring of Providence Marker (wide view)
markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Shelter for Persons Distressed (here, next to this marker); The Original Water Supply (a few steps from this marker); A Howling Wilderness (within shouting distance of this marker); Gabriel Bernon (within shouting distance of this marker); The Century to Statehood (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Thoroughfare Town (about 300 feet away); Witness to History (about 300 feet away); Snow Town Riot 1831 (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Providence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Roger Williams National Memorial.
Roger Williams National Memorial commemorates the life of the founder of Rhode Island and a champion of the ideal of religious freedom. Williams, banished from Massachusetts for his beliefs, founded Providence in 1636. This colony served as a refuge where all could come to worship as their conscience dictated without interference from the state. (Submitted on August 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Roger Williams: Founding Providence.
From Slate Rock, Roger and his companions rowed south along the Seekonk River, around the point of land now called Fox Point and continued up the Great Salt River. Where the Great Salt River split into the Moshassuck and Woonasquatucket Rivers, it opened up into a large Salt water cove. A Native trail, which stretched from the Massachusetts
Roger Williams Spring (<b><i>marker in the background</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 18, 2017
3. Roger Williams Spring (marker in the background)
Bay along the coast to New York, ran around the eastern edge of this cove. The English called this trail Towne Street. Emptying into the cove on the west side of the trail was a fresh water spring. East across the trail from this spring Roger built his house, on the lower slope of a great hill. (Submitted on August 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 30, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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