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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Helena in Phillips County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Life Under Union Occupation

 
 
Life Under Union Occupation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 26, 2017
1. Life Under Union Occupation Marker
Inscription. After the Union army arrived in July 1862, Helena was no longer part of the Confederacy. It was in Union hands and the Union commander made law and policy. The Moore-Hornor Home across the street was one of many in Helena seized by the Union army.

Family Homes Become Army Quarters
Arthur S. Thompson built the house in 1859, When the Union army marched into Helena, the house was empty, the family having fled to Kentucky.

The army seized this and other abandoned houses, including Confederate General Thomas C. Hindman's, for use as officers' quarters and office space. Families that remained in Helena, such as the Rightor and Richardson families, housed Union officers whether they wanted to or not.

Living Under Martial Law
The Union army controlled every aspect of civilian life in Helena. Union commanders decided who could buy and sell cotton. In 1863, General Benjamin Prentiss forbade trade with people living outside of Helena.

Residents could not leave the city with goods. Those who refused to take the Oath of Allegiance could not come into the city to buy goods. At least one resourceful young woman smuggled food past the Union sentries by concealing it under her petticoat.

"Our
The Moore-Hornor Home image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 26, 2017
2. The Moore-Hornor Home
High up, to the left of the house, you can see Graveyard Hill behind, the site of one of the bloodiest fights of the Battle of Helena.
dread is that our necessities will compel us to take the oath of allegiance to the Lincoln government. It is deeply repugnant to every feeling of our heart . ."
Mary Sale Edmondson
who lived outside of Helena


[Photo captions]
Top left: Robert Caswell Moore, 13th Arkansas Regiment, C.S Moore purchased the house in 1873. It belonged to his descendents for 118 years.
Bottom left: Citizens could not enter or leave Helena without a pass.
Individuals had to take the Oath of Allegiance in order to do business in Helena or to come into Helena to buy goods.
General Frederick Salomon directed the Union defense of the city from the Moore-Hornor Home during the Battle of Helena.

 
Erected 2013 by Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.
 
Location. 34° 31.537′ N, 90° 35.54′ W. Marker is in Helena, Arkansas, in Phillips County. Marker is at the intersection of Beech Street and York Street, on the right when traveling north on Beech Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 323 Beech Street, Helena AR 72342, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. U.S.C.T. in Helena (within shouting distance of this marker); Flags over Fort Curtis (within shouting distance of this marker); Defending Helena (within shouting distance of this marker); Who Built Fort Curtis (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Curtis, 1862-1867 (within shouting distance of this marker); The New Fort Curtis (within shouting distance of this marker); The Guns (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Battle of Helena (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Helena.
 
More about this marker. An Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial site and a part of the Arkansas Civil War Discovery Trail.
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 6, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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