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Port Republic in Atlantic County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Chestnut Neck

 
 
Battle of Chestnut Neck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 28, 2008
1. Battle of Chestnut Neck Marker
Inscription.
In honor
of
the Brave Patriots
of
the Revolutionary War
who defended
their liberties and
their homes in
a battle fought near
this site
October 6, 1778
----------
Dedicated
October 6, 1911

Lower Plaque:
Erected by the State of New Jersey
through the efforts of
Gen. Lafayette Chapter N.S.D.A.R.
Commissioners
Miss Sarah N. Doughty, Mrs. Jos. Thompson, Mrs. J.J. Gardner

Forward Marker:
In memory of those
Brave Patriots who took
part in the Battle of Chestnut Neck to further
the cause of American Liberty
and aid in the establishment of
our precious American freedoms.

 
Erected 1911 by National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, Gen. Lafayette Chapter.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 39° 32.676′ N, 74° 27.687′ W. Marker is in Port Republic, New Jersey, in Atlantic County. Marker is at the intersection of New York Road (U.S. 9) and Chestnut Neck Road (County Route 575), on the right when traveling north on New York Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Port Republic NJ 08241, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Lower Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 28, 2008
2. Lower Plaque
At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ship’s Rib ( within shouting distance of this marker); Privateers ( within shouting distance of this marker); 3rd Battalion Gloucester County Militia ( within shouting distance of this marker); British Anchor ( within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Port Republic, New Jersey ( about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Meeting House ( approx. 2.5 miles away); Smith's Meeting House ( approx. 2.5 miles away); Franklin Inn ( approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Port Republic.
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Chestnut Neck. The only battle of the American Revolution that took place on the West (South) Jersey coastline was a group of actions around the Little Egg Harbor River. New Jersey Pinelands website. (Submitted on August 28, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Forward Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 28, 2008
3. Forward Marker
This marker is found just outside the fence that surrounds the monument.
Battle of Chestnut Neck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 28, 2008
4. Battle of Chestnut Neck Marker
During the Revolutionary War, Congress commissioned sea captains to disrupt and pirate British shipping. These privateers made the British war effort much more costly.
Battle of Chestnut Neck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 28, 2008
5. Battle of Chestnut Neck Marker
In an effort to stop the "rebel pirates," the British attacked Chestnut Neck, NJ. The local militia fought back, but the British set fire to the village, burning ten ships, the shipyard, a mill and a saltworks. Despite the damage, the privateers were back up and running not long after the British left.
Closeup of Colonial Privateer image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 28, 2008
6. Closeup of Colonial Privateer
The Battle of Chestnut Neck Monument stands fifty feet tall and is topped by a colonial privateer, but the monument and the battle have been ignored by most students of the American Revolution.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,922 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 28, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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