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Rockville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Typhoid in Rockville

 
 
Typhoid in Rockville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 12, 2017
1. Typhoid in Rockville Marker
Inscription. During the 1913-1914 holiday season, 28 cases of typhoid fever were reported in Rockville and three people died.

The new U.S. Public Health Service investigated, and identified the town's water system as the problem. Contaminated ground water from the privy (private outhouse) at nearby 308 Baltimore Road had seeped through the cracked housing at well No.1 at Rockville's Pump House. Chlorine was immediately administered into the well to kill off the bacteria.

Public Health Bulletin No. 65, Typhoid Fever in Rockville, MD, publicized this sanitation issue nationwide, and Rockville illustrated both the problem and the solution. Following the typhoid epidemic, Rockville developed a municipal-wide sewerage system to complement the water system. When completed in 1916, all homes were required to connect.

Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection of the intestinal tract and occasionally the bloodstream. It is caused by a strain of Salmonella called Salmonella typhi. Due to improvements in water and sewer systems, by the 1950s it was considered an uncommon disease in the United States.
 
Location. 39° 5.111′ N, 77° 8.457′ W. Marker is in Rockville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on South Horners Lane. Touch for map.
Typhoid in Rockville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 12, 2017
2. Typhoid in Rockville Marker
Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 South Horners Lane, Rockville MD 20850, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rockville's Pump House (here, next to this marker); Rockville Station (approx. ¼ mile away); Saint Mary's Catholic Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Saint Mary’s Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Baseball Field (approx. half a mile away); Rockville Town Square (approx. half a mile away); Court House Square (approx. 0.6 miles away); Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rockville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Typhoid Fever in Rockville, MD. by L.L. Lumsden, 1914. (Submitted on September 13, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. M:26/13/5 Reading/Typhoid House, 308 Baltimore Road. Maryland Historic Sites Inventory Form. (Submitted on September 13, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Science & Medicine
 
Lemuel Offutt image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 12, 2017
3. Lemuel Offutt
Of the 28 typhoid victims in Rockville, three died, including Mayor Lee Offutt's 18-year-old son, Lemuel. He contracted typhoid when home from college on a visit and died after returning to school.
Close-up of photo on marker
Public Health Bulletin No. 65 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 12, 2017
4. Public Health Bulletin No. 65
Typhoid Fever in Rockville, MD, encouraged other cities and towns to build sewer systems and prevent outbreaks like the one that occurred in Rockville.
Close-up of image on marke
Illustration of Pumping Station at Rockville, MD and Its Surroundings<br>(Lumsden, 1914) image. Click for full size.
By Public Health Service, Lunden, 1914
5. Illustration of Pumping Station at Rockville, MD and Its Surroundings
(Lumsden, 1914)
This illustration from the Public Health Service booklet shows the Pump House and the private home that contaminated the well. Once the well was contaminated, typhoid was pumped to other homes through the city's water system.
Rockville's Typhoid Victims<br>By Age image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 12, 2017
6. Rockville's Typhoid Victims
By Age
Number
of
Victims.....Age
1...............0-4 years
3...............5-9 years
6...............10-14 years
6...............15-19 years
7...............20-29 years
1...............30-39 years
1...............40-49 years
3...............50+ years
Close-up of table on marker
“Typhoid House” image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 13, 2017
7. “Typhoid House”
308 Baltimore Road. Contamination from the privy at this house was found to have caused the 1913 typhoid outbreak in Rockville.
Death Rate for Typhoid Fever<br>United States,<br>1900-1960 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 12, 2017
8. Death Rate for Typhoid Fever
United States,
1900-1960
The rate of typhoid infection fell with the construction of sanitary water and sewer systems throughout the United States after epidemics like the one that occurred in Rockville. Typhoid is now considered an uncommon disease and most people in the United States who contract it are infected during overseas travel to underdeveloped countries.
Close-up of chart on marker
Lemuel Offutt image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 13, 2017
9. Lemuel Offutt
Lemuel Offutt (July 9, 1895 - July 9, 1914) is buried with his mother and sister in Saint Mary's Cemetery in Rockville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 21, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 13, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on September 13, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2. submitted on September 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 13, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on September 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on September 13, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   9. submitted on September 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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