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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Gettysburg in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Gettysburg Campaign

 
 
Gettysburg Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 27, 2008
1. Gettysburg Campaign Marker
Inscription. Gen. George G. Meade, who had replaced Hooker as Union commander, June 28, 1863, traveled this road from Taneytown to Gettysburg the night of July 1. He made his headquarters just south of Gettysburg.
 
Erected 1947 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Gettysburg Campaign marker series.
 
Location. 39° 43.772′ N, 77° 12.632′ W. Marker is near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is on Taneytown Road (State Highway 134) 0.4 miles north of Mason-Dixon Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Gettysburg PA 17325, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 2.5 miles away); Field Hospitals - Sixth Corps (approx. 3.6 miles away); Bridgeport (approx. 3.6 miles away in Maryland); Michael Trostle Farm (approx. 3.7 miles away); Field Hospitals - Third Corps (approx. 3.7 miles away); Field Hospitals - Fifth Corps (approx.
Gettysburg Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 27, 2008
2. Gettysburg Campaign Marker
3.7 miles away); 5th Wisconsin Volunteers (approx. 3.8 miles away); 49th Pennsylvania Infantry (approx. 3.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gettysburg.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
A Road to Gettysburg image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 27, 2008
3. A Road to Gettysburg
Looking north from the marker location. With so many local roads converging on Gettysburg, it is hard to find a farm lane in Adams County that did not witness some traffic related to the great battle. In addition to Meade, the Federal II Corps used the Taneytown Road to reach Gettysburg. Upon hearing of the death of General John Reynolds on July 1, 1863 at Gettysburg, General Meade dispatched the II Corps commander, General Winfield S. Hancock, to take charge at Gettysburg. Hancock traveled the thirteen miles from Taneytown to Gettysburg, arriving at around 3 p.m. that day.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,336 times since then and 131 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 29, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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