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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Tetonia in Teton County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Teton Range

 
 
Teton Range Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 23, 2017
1. Teton Range Marker
Inscription. Flanked by rock formations more than 2 1/2 billion years old, these 3 granite peaks rose up less than 9 million year (ago), very new as mountains go. They are still rising.
Hinged at the base of the ridge before you, a block of rock 40 miles long broke along a fault line, where the rock tipped up to become the top of the ridge. During the past 1/4 million years, extensive glacial ice sculptured these spectacular peaks from the hard, resistant granite.
 
Erected by Idaho Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 315.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Idaho State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 43° 47.544′ N, 111° 6.648′ W. Marker is near Tetonia, Idaho, in Teton County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 33 at milepost 136.5 and Trouts Ranch Road, on the left when traveling north on State Highway 33. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 485 Idaho Highway 33, Tetonia ID 83452, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John Colter (a few steps from this marker); Fordson Tractor (approx. 3.4 miles away); Tetonia School Bell
Teton Range Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 23, 2017
2. Teton Range Marker
Marker on the right
(approx. 3.4 miles away); a different marker also named John Colter (approx. 4.7 miles away); Teton County Veterans Memorial (approx. 4.7 miles away); Pierre's Hole Rendezvous and Battle (approx. 5.9 miles away); Pierre's Hole (approx. 7½ miles away).
 
Also see . . .  The Grand Tetons -- Greater Yellowstone Resource Guide. The first recorded American to see the Tetons was American adventurer John Colter in 1907, a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, he got hired away form Lewis and Clark on their return from Oregon by fur trader Manual Lisa to do some reconnaissance and PR work for Lisaźs trading post on the Yellowstone River. Colter was also the first American to see Yellowstone. Fur trappers, traders, and mountain men followed suit to frequent the range in the first half of the 19th century.
During the mountain man era the Grand Tetons served as helpful landmarks for the region because you can see them from so far away. French trappers, a no-nonsense lot, named the Grand Tetons ("Big Teats” in English) for their resemblance to women's breasts.
(Submitted on September 16, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Natural Features
 
Teton Range from the West image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 23, 2017
3. Teton Range from the West
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 70 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 16, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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