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West Chester in Chester County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battle of Brandywine

September 11, 1777

 
 
Battle of Brandywine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2017
1. Battle of Brandywine Marker
Inscription.
The American Right Flank Slows the British Advance
General Adam Stephen’s 3rd and 4th Virginia Regiments situated on the far right end of the American line on the crest of the present day Sandy Hollow Heritage Park held their positions until overwhelmed by superior British and Jaeger forces.

Their actions allowed Sullivan’s and Stirling’s forces to escape back down Birmingham Road and through Dilworthtown.

At the end of the battle, a British Lt. summarized the fight The Americans defended their guns to the last, indeed, several officers were cut down at their guns. The Americans have never fought so well before, and they fought to great advantage.”

The damage delivered to Cornwallis’ troops was so devastating and complete that Gen. Howe wrote in his journal that he believed 10,000 Americans held the hill.

The Americans’ Last Stand
6:30 – 7 PM: As Lord Cornwallis’ attack from the north forced the Continentals to retreat, it also threatened to block the road to Chester, the escape route.

General Greene, General Weedon and North Carolina troops under Brigadier General Nash attempted to slow down the British. They formed a semicircle south of the Dilworth Crossroads (between today’s Webb and Harvey Roads on either side of Wilmington Pike, today’s
Battle of Brandywine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2017
2. Battle of Brandywine Marker
Oakland Road).

They were joined in this effort by Casirmir Pulaski, a Polish nobleman with military experience and a volunteer officer at the Battle of Brandywine. He asked General Washington to allow him to lead the thirty horsemen, who formed the General’s escort.

Pulaski directed the horsemen to strike the flank of British soldiers in the lead of the advance and then withdraw, before the British realized that they were a small cavalry unit that could be easily overwhelmed. The unexpected attack helped to break the British advance, preventing pursuit of the retreating Continentals.
 
Location. 39° 54.211′ N, 75° 34.742′ W. Marker is in West Chester, Pennsylvania, in Chester County. Marker can be reached from S. New Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located in Sandy Hollow Heritage Park. Marker is in this post office area: West Chester PA 19382, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sandy Hollow (here, next to this marker); Brandywine Battlefield A Commonwealth Treasure (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); William Darlington Birthplace (approx. 0.6 miles away); Dilworthtown (approx. 0.7 miles away); Birmingham Hill
Markers in Sandy Hollow Heritage Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2017
3. Markers in Sandy Hollow Heritage Park
There are two markers at this location. The Battle of Brandywine marker can be seen on the right.
(approx. ¾ mile away); In Memory of Those Who Fell (approx. 0.8 miles away); First Defense Line (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Peace Garden at Birmingham (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Chester.
 
More about this marker. Several pictures appear on the marker that were taken at the 2014 Birmingham Township Reenactment.
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Battle of Brandywine at Sandy Hollow image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 16, 2017
4. Battle of Brandywine at Sandy Hollow
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 66 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 16, 2017, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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