Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Portland in Meigs County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Modern Day Buffington Island

Battle of Buffington Island

 
 
Modern Day Buffington Island Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 9, 2017
1. Modern Day Buffington Island Marker
Inscription.
The Battle Site Then and Now
The Battle of Buffington Island did not take place on the island in the Ohio River. Rather, Confederate and Union troops fought in this area. Much of the battlefield has not changed and continues to be used for farming.

The Ohio River has changed over time. In the 19th century, there were fords, including just upstream of Buffington Island, where the river could be crossed on foot or horseback. Heavy rains just days before Morgan's arrival raised the river, making it difficult for the raiders to cross but easier for Union gunboats to navigate. The Ohio River is much higher and wider now than it was the day of the battle due to the creation of dams in the 20th century to maintain the river depth for shipping purposes and flood control. In addition, there used to be a road alongside the river on which Morgan traveled north to escape the battle.

The Second Battle of Buffington Island
In the 1960s, Shelly Materials quietly began acquiring portions of the battlefield for quarrying. The company sought a permit for a loading facility in the mid-1990s triggering local residents, preservationists and organizations to fight the permit. The Buffington Island Battlefield Preservation Foundation was established and efforts are being made to list the
Modern Day Buffington Island Marker on far right. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 9, 2017
2. Modern Day Buffington Island Marker on far right.
entire battlefield on the National Register of Historic Places. Despite these efforts, it is expected that about a third of the battlefield will be lost to quarrying.

[Photo captions]:
Top left: This photograph, taken around 1929, of the northern tip of the island and the West Virginia coast is similar to what Morgan had hoped to see when he reached the island.
Top right: Created in 1933. Buffington Island State Memorial is a 3.97-acre park along the Ohio River. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Reenactors continue to portray Ohio's only Civil War battle at this park.

 
Erected by the Ohio Historical Society.
 
Location. 39° 0.138′ N, 81° 46.445′ W. Marker is in Portland, Ohio, in Meigs County. Marker can be reached from Ohio River Scenic Byway (Ohio Route 124) south of New Portland Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located within the Buffington Island Battlefield Memorial Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 56998 OH-124, Portland OH 45770, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confusion and Panic (here, next to this marker); Surprise Encounter (here, next to this marker); Capture in Columbiana County
Modern Day Buffington Island Marker amongst other markers. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 9, 2017
3. Modern Day Buffington Island Marker amongst other markers.
(here, next to this marker); Escape from the Ohio Penitentiary (here, next to this marker); Buffington Island (here, next to this marker); Attack from the West (here, next to this marker); Path of Destruction and Damage (here, next to this marker); The Battle of Buffington Island (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Portland.
 
Also see . . .  Buffington Island Battlefield Memorial Park. (Submitted on September 17, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Buffington Island Battlefield entrance sign. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 9, 2017
4. Buffington Island Battlefield entrance sign.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 17, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 17, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 17, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
Paid Advertisement