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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Hall in Bingham County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Shoshone-Bannock Tribes: Beyond the Reservation

 
 
Shoshone-Bannock Tribes: Beyond the Reservation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 22, 2017
1. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes: Beyond the Reservation Marker
Caption: (map on right) Reservation Boundary Changes Over Time.
Inscription. The Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868 is among the most important documents created between the U.S. government and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes. In addition to affirming the establishment of the Fort Hall Reservation, the Fort Bridger Treaty reserved the inherent rights of the Shoshone and Bannock people to self-government and self-preservation. This means the members of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes have the right to use any unoccupied federal public lands in the country for the purpose of hunting, fishing, and gathering. This provision of the treaty remains in force. Responsible stewardship of federal public lands is vital to the cultural preservation and life ways of the Shoshone-Bannock people.
The Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868 and the Soda Springs Treaty of 1863 were negotiated among the chiefs of the many bands of Shoshone and Bannocks who occupied a broad geographic area that today includes California, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Wyoming, and parts of Canada and Mexico. The chiefs who signed the treaty were identified as follows:

Shoshone Bands: Wash-a-Kie, Toop-se-po-wot, Taboonshe-ya, Pan-to-she-ga, Wau-ny-pitz, Nark-kok, Bazeel, Ninny-Bitse

Bannock Bands: Taggee, We-rat-ze-won-a-gen, Pan-sook-a-motse, Tay-to-ba, Coo-sha-gan, A-wite-etse

For more information about the history and
Shoshone-Bannock Tribes: Beyond the Reservation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 22, 2017
2. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes: Beyond the Reservation Marker
The marker is on the right.
culture of the Shoshone and Bannock people, please visit the Tribes' website or the Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Museum at Fort Hall, Idaho.
 
Erected by PacifiCorp.
 
Location. 43° 1.294′ N, 112° 24.657′ W. Marker is near Fort Hall, Idaho, in Bingham County. Marker can be reached from Ross Fort (Simplot) Road near Interstate 15, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Hall ID 83203, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Newe'm Bo'ai -- "Indian Road" (here, next to this marker); Shoshone and Bannock Tribes (within shouting distance of this marker); Chief Theater (approx. 11.2 miles away); Idaho State University (approx. 11.3 miles away); Chief Pocatello (approx. 12.1 miles away); The City of Pocatello (approx. 12.1 miles away); Pocatello's Name in WWII (approx. 12.1 miles away); Native Foods (approx. 12.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Hall.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located at the Shoshone-Bannock Information Center near the Ross Fork (Simplot) Road exit (Exit 80) of Interstate 15.
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 20, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 20, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 65 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 20, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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