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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pittsburgh in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First World Series

 
 
First World Series Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 22, 2012
1. First World Series Marker
Inscription. In October 1903, National League champion Pittsburgh played American League champion Boston in major league baseball's first modern World Series. Boston won the best-of-9 series, 5 games to 3; prominent players included Pittsburgh's Honus Wagner and Boston's Cy Young. Games 4 through 7 were played near this site at Exposition Park, Pittsburgh's home from 1891 to 1909.
 
Erected 2003 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 40° 26.733′ N, 80° 0.517′ W. Marker is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in Allegheny County. Marker can be reached from Mazeroski Way south of North Shore Dive. Touch for map. Located near PNC Park on the North Shore Riverwalk. Marker is in this post office area: Pittsburgh PA 15212, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Korean War Veterans' Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Vietnam Veterans Monument (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Southwestern Pennsylvania World War II Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Immaculate Reception (approx. mile away); David L. Lawrence (approx. mile
First World Series Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 22, 2012
2. First World Series Marker
PNC Park (Home of the Pittsburgh Pirates) in background
away); First Professional Football Game (approx. mile away); County of Allegheny Law Enforcement Officers Memorial (approx. mile away); The Forks of the Ohio (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pittsburgh.
 
Also see . . .
1. First World Series - Behind the Marker. (Submitted on June 29, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
2. 1903 World Series by Baseball Almanac. (Submitted on July 7, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Sports
 
First World Series Marker - Allegheny River on the left. image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 9, 2011
3. First World Series Marker - Allegheny River on the left.
The Pittsburgh Pirates in the dugout at the Huntington Avenue Grounds, 1903 World Series image. Click for full size.
Boston Public Library, 1903
4. The Pittsburgh Pirates in the dugout at the Huntington Avenue Grounds, 1903 World Series
Left to right: utility player Joe Marshall, infielder Otto Krueger, outfielder Jimmy Sebring, shortstop Honus Wagner, unidentified, catcher Eddie Phelps, the bat-boy, pitcher Gus Thompson, pitcher Deacon Phillippe, first baseman Kit Bransfield, outfielder Ginger Beaumont, pitcher Sam Leever, second baseman Claude Ritchey, and pitcher Brickyard Kennedy.
Boston Americans and Pittsburgh Pirates, Huntington Avenue Grounds, 1903 World Series image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, October 13, 1903
5. Boston Americans and Pittsburgh Pirates, Huntington Avenue Grounds, 1903 World Series
The Pirates: (Top, left to right)- second baseman Claude Ritchey, catcher Harry Smith, catcher Eddie Phelps, outfielder Ginger Beaumont, pitcher Deacon Phillippe, pitcher Sam Leever, pitcher Bucky Veil, pitcher Gus Thompson, outfielder Tommy Leach, outfielder Jimmy Sebring, pitcher Brickyard Kennedy, catcher Fred Carisch and shortstop Honus Wagner. Middle: Pirate manager and outfielder Fred Clarke. Boston players: third baseman-manager Jimmie Collins, outfielder Chick Stahl, pitcher Bill Dineen, outfielder Buck Freeman, first baseman Candy LaChance, outfielder Patsy Dougherty, pitcher George Winter, catcher Duke Farrell, outfielder Jack O'Brien, pitcher Long Tom Hughes. Bottom: shortstop Fred Parent, catcher Lou Criger, second baseman Hobe Ferris,
Early Baseball in Pittsburgh image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, September 25, 2012
6. Early Baseball in Pittsburgh
Part of the Three Rivers Heritage Trail
Pittsburgh's great baseball tradition began here more than a century ago. Pittsburgh and Allegheny (now the North Side) were twin cities that played out their local rivalry through "turf sports." The first ball park was an exhibition ground built in 1875 as part of the Tradesmen's Industrial Institute, later Exposition Park.

A distastrous fire in 1883 destroyed Exposition Park's buildings, but the field re-openede for baseball. From these early games, the Pittsburgh Pirates were formed in 1891. The Pirates became one of the nation's most important and successful teams, winning the National League Pennant three years in a row between 1901 and 1903. The first World Series was held in Pittsburgh and Boston in 1903. Hall-of-Famers Honus Wagner and Cy Young were among the players.

In 1909, the Pirates defeated the Chicago Cubs in the last game played in Exposition Park on the North Side.

Baseball fans stood for Taps at the end of the last play before the team moved to a new ballpark in Oakland called Forbes Field.
Early Baseball in Pittsburgh Interpretive Sign image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, September 25, 2012
7. Early Baseball in Pittsburgh Interpretive Sign
Located on the Riverwalk along the Allegheny River on Pittsburgh's North Side.
PNC Park, now the home of the Pittsburgh Pirates, is seen in the background.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 9, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,311 times since then and 66 times this year. Last updated on September 22, 2017, by Maureen Macel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 22, 2012, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on February 9, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   4, 5. submitted on July 7, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   6, 7. submitted on September 25, 2012, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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