Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lower Truro in Colchester County, Nova Scotia — The Canadian Atlantic
 

First Landing

 
 
First Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 27, 2017
1. First Landing Marker
Inscription.

In 1760-62 near this Head of Cobequid Bay the first English speaking settlers of the Townships of Onslow and Truro landed. Of Ulster Irish, Scottish and English stock, these pioneers were among those brought to Nova Scotia from New England by the government to take up the lands formerly occupied by the Acadians.
 
Location. 45° 22.29′ N, 63° 19.331′ W. Marker is in Lower Truro, Nova Scotia, in Colchester County. Marker is on Tidal Bore Road 0.6 kilometers north of Glooscap Trail (Nova Scotia Route 236), on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is on the grounds of the Truro Tidal Bore Viewing Visitor Centre. Marker is at or near this postal address: 103 Tidal Bore Road, Lower Truro, Nova Scotia B6L 1T9, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 5 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Lumber Jack, circa 1900 (approx. 3.3 kilometers away); Truro Post Office / Le Bureau de Poste de Truro (approx. 3.3 kilometers away); First Presbyterian/United Church (approx. 3.4 kilometers away); Centennial of Presbyterian Church Formation in Canada (approx. 3.4 kilometers away); Old Provincial Normal College (approx. 3.5 kilometers away); War Memorial (approx. 3.5 kilometers away).
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels

 
First Landing Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 27, 2017
2. First Landing Marker
Visitors awaiting the High Tide Tidal Bore along the Salmon River
The Salmon River image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 27, 2017
3. The Salmon River
Looking SSW, with people awaiting the high tide tidal bore
The Salmon River image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 27, 2017
4. The Salmon River
Looking SSW, after the high tide tidal bore has passed and the waters from the Bay of Fundy continue filling the river basin
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 27, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 27, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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