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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Waikoloa in Hawaii County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Kamehameha II

(1797 - 1824)

 
 
Kamehameha II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 28, 2017
1. Kamehameha II Marker
Inscription. Liholiho ascended the throne at a time when foreign influences, and new standards and ideas were propelling the Hawaiians into the modern western world. During his reign, the kapu system was abolished and the missionaries arrived, brining Christianity, education, the printing press as well as introduction of whaling and the sandalwood trade.
 
Erected by Waikoloa Village.
 
Location. 19° 55.023′ N, 155° 52.985′ W. Marker is in Waikoloa, Hawaii, in Hawaii County. Marker can be reached from Waikoloa Beach Drive near Ku'uali'i Place, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 250 Waikoloa Beach Drive, Waikoloa HI 96738, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kamehameha I (here, next to this marker); Kamehameha IV (here, next to this marker); Kamehameha V (here, next to this marker); Kamehameha III (a few steps from this marker); William Charles Lunalilo (a few steps from this marker); The Waikoloa Petroglyph Field (approx. ¼ mile away); Queen Kapi'olani (approx. 0.3 miles away); Queen Lili'uokalani (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waikoloa.
 
More about this marker.
Kamehameha II Marker, on the right image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 28, 2017
2. Kamehameha II Marker, on the right
This is one of six markers honoring the kings of Hawai'i located near Macy's in the King's Shops at Waikoloa Village.
 
Also see . . .  Kamehameha II: Liholiho and the Impact of Change -- Hawaiian Electronic Library. The kapu, rules regarding what was forbidden or sacred, made up a complex system regulating what Hawaiians could and could not do... Kapu was most burdensome in its effect upon the makaʻāinana and upon all women, even aliʻi women. One of the kapu best remembered now is the ʻai kapu which forbade men and women from eating together. Women were also forbidden to eat certain foods including pork, most varieties of bananas, coconuts and certain kinds of fish, particularly shark. (Submitted on October 13, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable Persons
 
Kamehameha II image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer
3. Kamehameha II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 13, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 13, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 101 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 13, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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