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Enon in Chesterfield County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Siege of Petersburg Begins

The Bermuda Hundred Campaign

 
 
The Siege of Petersburg Begins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 28, 2017
1. The Siege of Petersburg Begins Marker
Inscription. After taking heavy losses at Cold Harbor, Lt. Gen. Grant made the decision to move his army across the James River and attack Petersburg. The capture of that city and its key rail links would cut off Richmond from the rest of the Confederacy.

June 9
As Grant prepared to move from Cold Harbor, he ordered the 10th Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore, to attack Petersburg from its position in Bermuda Hundred. Confederate forces put up enough resistance to convince Gillmore to halt the attack.

June 12-13
Grant pulled his army out of Cold Harbor and began to move to the James River.

June 15
The 18th Corps, commanded by Gen. William F. “Baldy” Smith, crossed the Appomattox River at Point of Rocks and captured more than a mile of the Dimmock Line fronting Petersburg. Rumors of Confederate reinforcements caused Smith to stop his advance. Confederate Gen P.G.T. Beauregard began to withdraw troops from the Howlett Line in Bermuda Hundred and send them to defend Petersburg.

June 16
The 2nd Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock, continued the attack on Petersburg. In Bermuda Hundred the Howlett Line was captured by the Federals when it was abandoned in order to send troops to Petersburg. Confederate reinforcements
The Siege of Petersburg image. Click for full size.
Chesterfield Historical Society of Virginia
2. The Siege of Petersburg
retook the line that evening.

June 17
The 2nd Corps continued its attack on Petersburg joined by the 9th Corps under the command of Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside.

June 18
Grant had the bulk of his army across the James River. A third Union assault was made against the lines at Petersburg by the 1st Corps, 2nd Corps and 9th Corps. This assault failed to break through the Confederate line.

The failure to quickly capture Petersburg led to 10 long months of siege warfare. The opening actions at Petersburg also marked the end of the Bermuda Hundred Campaign. With Grant anchored at Petersburg, the Army of the James came under his direction. Maj. Gen. Butler no longer had an independent command.

This sign was sponsored by Major Randy Brooks, Whispering Pines, NC
 
Erected 2016 by Chesterfield County and the Blue & Gray Education Society.
 
Location. 37° 19.103′ N, 77° 20.231′ W. Marker is in Enon, Virginia, in Chesterfield County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Enon Church Road (Virginia Route 746) and Point of Rocks Road, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. The marker is located in Historic Point of Rocks Park (under development). Marker is at or near this postal address: 1005 Enon Church Rd, Chester VA 23836, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Siege of Petersburg Begins Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 28, 2017
3. The Siege of Petersburg Begins Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. United States Colored Troops in the Army of the James (within shouting distance of this marker); African-Americans in the Confederate War Effort (within shouting distance of this marker); Point of Rocks Hospital Ward (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Attacks on Petersburg (within shouting distance of this marker); Nurses at Point of Rocks Hospital (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Point of Rocks Hospital (about 500 feet away); Abraham Lincoln at Point of Rocks (about 500 feet away); Appomattox River Overlook (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Enon.
 
Also see . . .  Bermuda Hundred Sign Campaign. Blue & Gray Education Society (Submitted on October 30, 2017.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 30, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 30, 2017, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on October 30, 2017, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   2. submitted on October 30, 2017.   3. submitted on October 30, 2017, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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