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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Celaya in Municipality, Guanajuato, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

Independence Column of Celaya

La Columna de Independencia de Celaya

 
 
Independence Column of Celaya Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2017
1. Independence Column of Celaya Marker
The first and second sides of the monument can be seen in this view.
Inscription.
1
A la perpetua memoria de la Independencia

2
Estas armas blazon glorioso de la patria

3
En monumento de su fidelidad y amor.

4
Erigio Celaya año de 1823 2º de su libertad.


English translation:
To the perpetual memory of Independence

The glorious symbols of the nation

Are a monument to her fidelity and love.

Created by Celaya in 1823, the 2nd year of liberty.

 
Erected 1823.
 
Location. 20° 31.334′ N, 100° 48.732′ W. Marker is in Celaya, Guanajuato, in Municipality. Marker is on Calle Independencia just south of Calle Francisco I. Madero, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Celaya, Guanajuato 38000, Mexico.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Temple of Saint Francis (within shouting distance of this marker); The Temple of San Francisco - Headquarters of the Patroness of Celaya (within shouting distance of this marker); Celaya's Water Tower (within shouting distance of this marker); Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla (within shouting distance of this marker);
Independence Column of Celaya Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2017
2. Independence Column of Celaya Marker
This view shows the monument's third and fourth sides.
The First Franciscans in Celaya (within shouting distance of this marker); The History of Celaya (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Ex-Convent of the Temple of Saint Augustine (about 210 meters away); Miguel Hidalgo in Celaya (about 240 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Celaya.
 
Regarding Independence Column of Celaya. This monument to Mexican Independence, one of the earliest constructed only two years after final independence was gained in 1821, was designed by Celaya's own most famous architect Tresguerras.
 
Categories. Wars, Non-US
 
Independence Column of Celaya Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2017
3. Independence Column of Celaya Marker
Independence Column of Celaya image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2017
4. Independence Column of Celaya
This view of the monument is from its reverse, closer to the entrance to the Temple of Saint Francis.
Independence Column of Celaya image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2017
5. Independence Column of Celaya
The column is topped by an eagle with a serpent in its beak, a traditional symbol of the Aztecs and, by extension, Mexico. The eagle is perched over symbols of war: cannon, swabber, a drum and other objects.
An additional Independence Column of Celaya Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2017
6. An additional Independence Column of Celaya Marker
These additional inscriptions are on the reverse of the column's base. The upper marker describes the bases' restoration in 1959, the 200th anniversary of the birth of Tresguerras, during the Municipal government of Jesús Gómez de la Cortina. The second marker was placed during the 200th anniversary celebrations of Independence and is dedicated to the "Heroes that Forged Our Nation" (Heroes que forjaron nuestra patria...)
An additional marker located on the Independence Monument of Celaya image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2017
7. An additional marker located on the Independence Monument of Celaya
This additional marker fastened to the monument was placed in 2010 during the 200th anniversary celebrations of Mexican Independence. It was place by the Municipal Government led by Rubí Laura López Silva.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 1, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 52 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 1, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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