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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brooklyn in Kings County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Replica of the Statue of Liberty, circa 1900

Unknown Artist and Maker

 

—(American, Akron, Ohio) —

 
Replica of the Statue of Liberty, circa 1900 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, August 23, 2015
1. Replica of the Statue of Liberty, circa 1900 Marker
Inscription. Unknown Artist and Maker
(American, Akron, Ohio)
Replica of the Statue of Liberty, circa 1900
Galvanized sheet steel and zinc over iron frame
Gift of the Athena-Liberty Lofts, L.P., The Athena group, and Brickman Associates, in honor of the Fire Department of New York, New York police Department, Emergency Medical Services, and the New York State Court Officers and their heroism on September 11, 2001

Perhaps no American symbol is more widely recognized or powerfully expressive than “Liberty Enlightening the World” – the Statue of Liberty. Since 1885, when the 151-foot original created by the French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi (1834-1904) was erected on Bedloe’s Island, the colossal figure has inspired numerous smaller-scale replicas intended to echo the ideas of freedom, tolerance, and opportunity that it embodied for many of the immigrants arriving at Ellis Island. This thirty-foot replica was commissioned about 1900 by the Russian-born auctioneer William H. Flattau to sit atop his eight-story Liberty warehouse (at 43 West 64th Street), then one of the highest points on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Flattau thus combined his entrepreneurial spirit with pride in the adopted country in which he had prospered. Although squatter in proportion and less gracefully detailed than the
Replica of the Statue of Liberty image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, August 23, 2015
2. Replica of the Statue of Liberty
massive original, Flattau’s replica retained something of the forceful gravity of expression achieved by Bartholdi.
Newly restored, this “little” Lady Liberty takes its place within the distinguished collection of outdoor sculpture and architectural fragments the Brooklyn Museum began about 1960, in an effort to preserve unique New York City treasures that were increasingly at risk.
The installation of the Museum’s Statue of Liberty replica and the associated conservation project were made possible by the generosity of The Joseph S. and Diane H. Steinberg Charitable Trust. Additional support was given by the New York State Assembly and its Brooklyn Delegation, and John and Diana Herzog

 
Erected by The Brooklyn Museum.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Statue of Liberty Replicas marker series.
 
Location. 40° 40.248′ N, 73° 57.836′ W. Marker is in Brooklyn, New York, in Kings County. Marker is on Eastern Parkway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brooklyn NY 11238, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ionic Capital and Column Base, circa 1901 (here, next to this marker); Four Pairs of Pegasus Figures, 1934 (here, next to this
Replica of the Statue of Liberty image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, August 23, 2015
3. Replica of the Statue of Liberty
marker); Atlantes Figures, circa 1899 (here, next to this marker); Pilaster Capitals, 1898 (here, next to this marker); Nine Keystones, circa 1924/"Night", circa 1910 (here, next to this marker); Plaque, circa 1885 (a few steps from this marker); The Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden (approx. 0.2 miles away); James T Stranahan (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brooklyn.
 
More about this marker. In the sculpture garden of the Brooklyn Museum.
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, Music
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 2, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 52 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 2, 2017, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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