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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Coosa in Floyd County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians

 
 
Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 7, 2015
1. Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker
Inscription. Buried in the grave sixty feet south of this point is Esther Post Butler. Born in Connecticut on September 15, 1795, Post married Dr. Elizur Butler, physician and minister, in October 1820. The Butlers were sent by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions to Brainerd and then to Creek Path, before arriving at the Haweis Mission, near Rome, in 1826. Mrs. Butler died in 1829 after eight years of service to the Cherokees.

Two years later Dr. Butler was arrested for residing in the Cherokee Nation without taking an oath of allegiance to the State of Georgia and obtaining a license from the Governor. Sentenced, with Samuel Worcester, to four years of hard labor in the State penitentiary at Milledgeville, he was pardoned by Governor Wilson Lumpkin in 1833, almost a year after the United States Supreme Court nullified the law under which the missionaries were arrested. Upon his release, Dr. Butler returned to the Mission at Haweis, but was forced to move the following year. In addition to attending the Cherokees during the Removal, Dr. Butler served the missions at Red Clay, Park Hill, and Fairfield and the Cherokee Female Seminary prior to his death in Arkansas in 1857.
 
Erected 1967 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 057-14.)
 
Location.
Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 7, 2015
2. Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker
The marker stands in front of the fences surrounding the Butlers' graves.
34° 15.1′ N, 85° 21.733′ W. Marker is near Coosa, Georgia, in Floyd County. Marker is on Georgia Route 20 0.2 miles west of Fosters Mill Road (Georgia Route 100), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. The marker is below the level of the road and can be difficult to see. Marker is in this post office area: Coosa GA 30129, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery (approx. 1.3 miles away); General Thomas Edwin Greenfield Ransom 1834-1864 (approx. 5.1 miles away); Berry Schools' Old Mill (approx. 8.2 miles away); Georgia School for the Deaf (approx. 10.1 miles away); Gen. N.B. Forrest Captured Col. A.D. Streight (approx. 10.3 miles away in Alabama); Berry College (approx. 10.4 miles away); Ellen Louise Axson Wilson (approx. 10˝ miles away); Georgia’s Paul Revere (approx. 10˝ miles away).
 
More about this marker. When Georgia Highway 20 was widened the marker was removed and eventually reinstalled adjacent to the graves, which are no longer "sixty feet south" of the marker.
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkChurches & ReligionNative Americans
 
Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 7, 2015
3. Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker
Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 7, 2015
4. Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians Marker
The ground in the left of the photo slopes up to the highway.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 6, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 15, 2017, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 67 times since then. Last updated on November 4, 2017, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 15, 2017, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.
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