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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
White Bird in Idaho County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Salmon River Canyon

Some 15 million years ago, Salmon River ran across great Miocene lava flows

 

—above here and started to carve this deep canyon —

 
Salmon River Canyon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2013
1. Salmon River Canyon Marker
Inscription.
Then this part of the earth’s surface gradually rose. As the mountains were rising, the river cut down into the older rock below. Many other northwestern rivers cut similar gorges. The Snake flows through Hell’s Canyon – deepest of them all – 8 miles west of here.
 
Erected by Idaho State Historical Society & Idaho Transportation Department. (Marker Number 313.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Idaho State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 45° 36.821′ N, 116° 16.886′ W. Marker is in White Bird, Idaho, in Idaho County. Marker is on U.S. 95 one mile south of Slate Creek Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pull-out on the west side US highway 95 overlooking the Salmon River and Canyon. Marker is in this post office area: White Bird ID 83554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fabulous Florence (approx. 4.7 miles away); Hydraulic Mining (approx. 4.7 miles away); Nez Perce War (approx. 13 miles away); You've Got Mail (approx. 13˝ miles away).
 
More about this marker. A large wooden marker in good
Salmon River Canyon Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2013
2. Salmon River Canyon Marker (wide view)
condition
 
Also see . . .
1. A River of History - Idaho's Salmon River of No Return.
It earns its name “The River of No Return” for its wilderness shrouded, roadless section which spans a massive piece of country between the outposts of Salmon and Riggins Idaho. Pioneers managed to assemble watercraft to navigate the waters but once they passed into the canyon no way back to the start existed. Massive “sweep” boats served as the early supply line into the canyon, but once they reached their destination, currents proved to powerful to return them back to their point of origin thus forcing the hearty men and women to disassemble them and use them for lumber. Hence the name “River of No Return”. (Submitted on November 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Salmon "River of No Return" History.
When Lewis and Clark encountered this gorge, they turned back and followed an old Indian route around the area. Early fur trappers also avoided the Salmon canyon. In the 1860s, gold was discovered in the Salmon River country, and prospectors quickly explored the area. Most of the gravel bars of the Salmon River contained gold dust in small quantities. Miners working a sluicebox along the high-water line, with an investment of a few boards, shovels, picks and crowbars, made a dollar a day up through the Depression years. (Submitted on November 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Salmon River Canyon (<i>view looking south from the marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2013
3. Salmon River Canyon (view looking south from the marker)
 

3. Salmon River, Idaho.
The Salmon flows through a vast wilderness in one of the deepest gorges on the continent. Its granite-walled canyon is one-fifth of a mile deeper than the Grand Canyon, and, for approximately 180 miles, the Salmon Canyon is more than one mile deep. (Submitted on November 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Salmon River Canyon (<i>view looking north from the marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2013
4. Salmon River Canyon (view looking north from the marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 6, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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